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Chris727

Honing a briggs

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Chris727
Hi. I am going to install new rings in a 10hp cast iron briggs. I have a craftsman engine hone but was wondering if the stones must be a particular grit for this job. Also wondering if I have to lubricate the cylinder with something as I hone it. Should I just use penetrating oil? Thank You. Chris

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stevei46
Chris your hone should be fine, kerosene is a good honing lubricant keep the hone moving up and down and don't stop for to long in one spot. put the kero in a oil can and keep it flowing, it won't take long to break the glaze in the bore. you should see a criss cross pattern when your finished. when your happy with it wash it out with soapy water and rinse then a light coat of oil to keep it from rusting hope this helps

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HubbardRA
Thanks for the advice, Thom. I have always honed without lubricant. Guess I have just been lucky. No problems with any of the engines, so far. I have also had good luck with glaze breaking by using 180 grit sandpaper and my fingers. As I said, guess I am just lucky with my downhome methods. Works for me, no guarantee it will work for someone else. One thing for sure, the cylinder must be washed out with soap and water before re-assembly. Cleaning solvents will not remove the grit like the soap and water will.

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IronPony
I am just a novice but I have a complete K301S that was burning oil when I took it out of my AC712. Let me get this right - just hone the cylinder and replace the rings? Is that all? How do I tell if it has been bored out so that I get the right rings? Dan aka IronPony

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PatRarick
Dan, if it's been rebored, the top of the piston will be stamped .010, .020, or .030, indicating the overbore. On edit: For the standard bore, Kohler offers the standard rings, as well as a .003 oversize for slightly worn cylinders. Pat

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D-17_Dave
One thing to keep in mind is the amount of cyl. wear. Most engines will wear the cyl. egg shapped. You'll need to mic the cyl. at several different points down the bore. Another way to gauge the wear is to remove the rings and measure or visually look at the room the piston has inside the bore. A lot of piston slop even with new rings won't cure the oil burn and the lose of compression. The idea of romoveing the "Glaze" from the cyl. is to scuff the cyl. enough to remove the polished surface from the old ring wear pattern so the new rings will seat properly. If you don't, the new rings will act as worn and sometimes more worn due to passing oil and compression as the old rings were. This ussually only takes a fine stone or sanding grit to rough up the cyl. You never want to have a scratch you can feel with you hand, but you should be able to see the scratching of the stones.

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