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portuncia

B-110 Restoration

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portuncia
Aquired a B-110 it is now in two parts because the former owner had the BGB fixed, I have been told that it ran before. My plan is to make this my first complete restoration but I would like to check the motor out first, currently I have all the parts except Battery, and I don't have the key for the ignition switch. Can I 'hot wire' this to check the motor. I assume there shouldn't be any problem with trying to start the motor sitting in the tractor frame. Of course I will drain and refill the oil and check and clean the breather, is there anything else I can do to make life simple. Also,,, has anyone used Harbor Freights sand blaster, does it work? Is there an advantage to using a spray gun to paint rather than spray cans and can you get the correct colors for spraying? Any other suggestions and help is appreciated. I will be posting pictures as I go.

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UCD
To start with battery in tractor disconnect the wire from the switch to the points at the block on the points box. Next use a short piece of wire or screwdriver to jumper from the small terminal on the solenoid to the positive lead from the battery on the large post on the solenoid not the starter side. the engine should turn over and start. To shut the engine of if it starts and runs, take a screwdriver and short the spark plug to the head. With battery out of tractor disconnect switch wire. Run jumper cables from starting battery to tractor. Place the negative cable on the mounting bolt on starter generator, touch positive jumper cable to the large post of solenoid on starter side of solenoid Engine should turn over and start if every thing else is ok.

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BrianP
You didn't say whether or not the sandblaster you're looking at is a pressurized or gravity feed variety. I've used the gravity feed variety, but it tends to clog (especially if the sand has any moisture in it)and makes a HUGE mess. I lay out a tarp for larger objects so I can recycle my media (sand, walnut shells etc.) also you MUST get a hood and respirator to wear. I haven't used my little gravity feed unit in years, my father-in-law has a better pressureized unit and, being retired, is more than willing to take this kind of job on. :D Concerning your questions regarding a spray gun vs. rattle-can, there's no comparison. With a gun, you can get a much better finish and (by adding the appropriate hardeners) taylor the paint to the conditions you'll be painting under. Use lots of light and position yourself at an angle to the surface, where you can see how you're "wetting out" the paint. When you see a gloss, move to the next section to avoid runs. This takes practice, so you may want to use a piece of scrap metal to test your spray pattern on. I used to paint cars in the 1980's as part of my auto restoration hobby. There were two types of paint, enamel which shined right away, and laquer which required lots of polishing to bring up the gloss. I used to spray in a garage with good ventilation, and the biggest problem was bugs in the paint job, or the occasional run if I got too heavy with the paint. Again, use a properly rated respirator! Overall, if you're goint all out in a restoration, you'll want to use a spray gun. The newer HVLP (High Volume Low Pressure) guns are supposed to be better than the old fashioned one I used to use. Of course, you will also need an air compressor with a pressure regulator and moisture trap for the best results. You may want to take a class, check a book or video out of the local library or best of all, find a friend who'll show you the ropes. ;) My machines are work machines, rebuilt to the best of my ability and then worked as they were intended, so I use Rust Oleum rattle cans. For my purpose, they work just fine. It all depends upon the level of restoration you want to execute. I didn't mean to get so long-winded, but hopefully this will help you make your decision. Good luck.

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portuncia
Thanks for the responses UCD and Brian. I guess we will see if the old motor is in working order then its on to the tranny. I would like to completely assemble it first and get it in working order then tear it apart and start the restoration. Should be fun.

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