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MisterB

Ignition Conversion

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MisterB
I've decided to convert the ignition in my 1978 7014S from magneto to a coil/battery type such as was done by Ken Williams and documented in this how-to article: http://www.simpletractors.com/do_it/magneto_to_coil.htm I understand how this works, but in converting my tractor I found a couple of things that weren't mentioned in the how-to. 1.) My tractor has an ammeter. Does it need to have a connection to the new ignition switch as it did before? 2.) I've attached a picture of what I think might be a ballast resister? There is a fuse of some sort near there as well. Can anyone confirm either or both and tell me what they're for? Thanks in advance for any advice :) [img]http://www.simpletractors.com/club2/attach/MisterB/IMG_0004.JPG[/img]

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firefoxz1
Rich should be correct on that and all power from the battery to anywhere except the heavy wire starter circuit should go through the breaker(fuse) and anmeter. The battery pole of the ignition switch should come from the anmeter as it was before.

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HubbardRA
Power from the ignition switch must go to the + side of the coil if it is internally ballasted (such as a Kohler coil). If using an external ballast resistor, then the wire from the switch should run thru the ballast resistor then to the coil. The points and condenser can remain the same as the were, just disconnect the wires from the magneto and connect a wire from the - side of the coil to the points, condenser terminal. I have owned several Kohler engines with this type of ignition, and my B/S 243431 is set up with this type of ignition after the magneto died 20 years ago.

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MisterB
I have a copy of the original owners manual and there is a schematic diagram within. I'm trying to figure out what the fuse is for, the one in the picture just below the circuit breaker. I could not find reference to this fuse in the schematic. Any ideas?

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gregc
quote:
Originally posted by MisterB
I have a copy of the original owners manual and there is a schematic diagram within. I'm trying to figure out what the fuse is for, the one in the picture just below the circuit breaker. I could not find reference to this fuse in the schematic. Any ideas?
There should be a 7 1/2 amp fuse in the fuse holder to protect the 3 amp charging alternator and rectifier from burnout due to improper (reverse polarity) battery connections. The 5 amp lighting alternator doesn't need a fuse as a short circuit in it's output won't damage it.

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MisterB
I decided to re-use as much of the original wiring to avoid ruining any of the electrical system and to keep things as simple as possible. ;) I really didn't want to bypass any of the safety inter-locks either. I spent some time with the schematic diagram and a fluke meter testing each section of the wiring harness and replacing any connectors that looked questionable. I did take the time to use shrink tubing and covers wherever possible. Finally, I installed the new battery ignition system using the guide I found on this web site. I used the same part numbers found in the guide (ordered everything but the ignition switch from JSE). After checking all connections, turned the key and BINGO...it started right up :D I had to mount the coil on the engine laying horizontally as there just wasn't a suitable location anywhere else. How long can I expect the Kohler coil to last with it being subjected to the vibration from the engine? I suspect this is an oil filled coil or is it by some chance epoxy filled? As always, my sincerest thanks to the club and it's members for being a valuable source of information and support. The dues I pay are the best investment I've ever made. Regards, Ken

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HubbardRA
MisterB, The Kohler coil that I have mounted on my B/S 243431 engine is mounted on the head and lays horizontal. It has been there about 10 years. Before that I used an epoxy filled motorcycle coil, which died after several years of use.

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