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mowerman1193

Spark Plugs??

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mowerman1193
Anyone have a way to cross a Briggs part number to something else?I have a cross ref. chart but not for the briggs part number..Looking in the application charts one book says one number and another shows that number not for Briggs twins..The briggs number for the plug is 394539 for a 1983 16hp Briggs twin L head engine.. BTW what is you prefered spark plug brand..Everything I have has Champions in them but I have never been real fond of them..just seems all the application charts only show numbers for small engines for champion plugs.. I found this cross ref. chart but it don't list the briggs part numbers so I don't know whatI need.. http://www.brownandwiser.com/plugs.html

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gregc
Go to the briggs site to choose your spark plug: http://www.briggsandstratton.com/display/router.asp?DocID=66501 The briggs number 394539 has been superseded to the one in the chart. The chart gives the cross to the Champion plug also. Then you can use the chart that you linked to cross to another mfg.

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FastPaul
Dose your tractor have a blue oval on it's grill?
quote:
Originally posted by msiebern
Not as easy to find, but I prefer Autolite plugs. http://www.autolitesparkplugs.com/Default.asp http://www.autolitesparkplugs.com/more_info.asp?otherMotiveID=41270&pid=8280

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msiebern
quote:
Originally posted by FastPaul
Dose your tractor have a blue oval on it's grill?
No, but it doesn't burn rice either ;) I have used Autolites in my old farm tractors every since we spent weeks chasing down a problem with our F-20 and a guy at one of the shows told us to try Autolite plugs. Worked like a charm on the mag fired tractors, so I have kept allegiance with them on my other toys and have not regretted it.

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HubbardRA
I always use Champions. Haven't had much trouble with them. Tried a Prestolite in a Kohler pulling engine. It lasted two weeks. Went back to the Champion H10 for that one. Biggest problem I have seen is with the cross reference to other brands. Get a plug too cold, and it will last, but the engine will tend to miss and just will not run well. Get a plug too hot and it will burn itself up, and can also put a hole thru the piston if the plug is extremely hot for that engine. I have built and worked on several high performance engines for pulling tractors, drag racers, and circle track cars. It can be a real pain to find the exact heat range in the spark plugs, that will work best in an engine that has been modified.

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BLT
quote:
Originally posted by MisterB
Anyone try using Split-Fire plugs in small engines? I've heard some folks swear by them in their cars/trucks. KB
They are supposed help (for a premium price) eliminate fowling because of the split electrode. I tried them and they are not worth the money. Another idea for the scrap heap. My best luck has been Champions.

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GWGAllisfan
Rod's remarks got me thinking about whether or not the plug heat range or gap would need to be changed when converting from Magneto to coil ignition. What do you all think?

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HubbardRA
Randy, Been there, done that. The answer is "no". The ignition will either fire the plug, or not fire it. The heat range of the plug is related to air/fuel ratio, compression, location of plug in the head, movement of flame front across the head, etc. In other words, when the engine is putting out full power, how hot is the plug electrode. A "hot" plug is for a cooler combustion chamber, and a "cold" plug is for a hotter chamber. There is an ideal operating temperature for a spark plug, and finding this temp is the primary reason for changing the heat range of the plug.

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