Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

  • Announcements

    • Kent

      Sign In or Password Problems?   10/09/2016

      If you can't Sign In, you need to reset your password.  Use the Forgot Your Password link at the bottom of the Sign In screen, and the site will send you an email to reset it. If you have an AOL email account, use the Contact Us link at the bottom of the screen -- AOL is intermittently blocking email from the site.
    • Kent

      Feedback Please!   10/28/2017

      See News and Announcements forum.
Sign in to follow this  
BrianP

Where's the regulator?

Recommended Posts

BrianP
Greetings all, I'm currently working on my father-in-law's little Murray lawn tractor, rebuilding the Briggs on it, (I know, but for my labor I get a nice little 727 with attachments ^), but it doesn't seem to have a voltage regulator. As an added bonus, I'm converting my emergency generator from pull-start to electric start, and his little Murray is a great tool to model my conversion on. But once again, I was scratching my head trying to find out where the regulator is. I traced the wires, and all I found was a single wire from the armature under the flywheel, to the ignition switch! It does have what looks like "heat shrink" material making the wire thicker in one area. Anyone ever encounter this kind of setup?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PatRarick
What you are describing is the unregulated, 3 amp charging system. Elon, you are correct in that a diode is encased in the heat shrink. But the diode is not a regulator. It's a converter. AC current is generated by the engine's alternator. The diode converts that AC current to DC current for charging the battery. Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ehertzfeld
quote:
Originally posted by PatRarick
What you are describing is the unregulated, 3 amp charging system. Elon, you are correct in that a diode is encased in the heat shrink. But the diode is not a regulator. It's a converter. AC current is generated by the engine's alternator. The diode converts that AC current to DC current for charging the battery. Pat
Yeah, that right!:D I knew there was more to it than I wrote.:D I remember reading somthing about that in one of my Briggs books. Elon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BrianP
Thanks to all who replied. I knew a diode was sort of a one-way valve for electricity, but didn't know about the conversion from AC to DC. Now that it's been explained, it makes sense. My guess is it sends the voltage through the diode, the key switch, and then on to the battery. Interesting approach.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

×