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Mat Perucci

Got a B212 today

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Mat Perucci
Today I picked up a B212. It was stuck in 1st gear so I freed it up. I also have a B112 and what a difference between the two. Everything on the B212 is just like the B112 but improved. The seats more comgfortable the varidrive is easier to move. The steering rod is thicker and it seems that Im seated much higher.

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Ketchamized
Mat, Congratulations on your buy! I have 2 Allis B-210's. The difference between your B-212 and mine is simply this- mine has a 10hp engine, yours has a 12hp engine. As for the difference between a B112 and a B212... You can view this page to compare: http://www.simpletractors.com/models/ac_b-series.htm From what I read, it is my understanding that the B112 and the B212 has the exact same engine. Also, that the B-212 is a newer tractor... This is from memory, so the details might be hazy- but basically, there was a monopoly law that went in effect, saying that each tractor company's tractors must be different or something like that. So, when that law went in effect, they opened up a new plant, and that new plant built the B-200 series. And the other plant changed Simplicity tractors so it looked different from the Allis tractors. Something like that. I'm sure that UCD or some others here will know the exact details. I just took a look and compared at the charts between the B112 and the B212, and it seems that there is NO difference between them. The only difference is the B112 is earlier and B212 is newer. Perhaps the differences are a reflection in terms of improved padding material used in the seat, improved greases, improved oil, improved bearings, improved washers, small things of that nature. Perhaps the hydraulic pump is different too. Kind of a version difference. B-100 series = Version 1.0, B-200 series = version 2.0, you know what I mean? Hope that answers your question... Congratulations on your new tractor. :)

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gregc
quote:
Originally posted by Ketchamized
Mat, This is from memory, so the details might be hazy- but basically, there was a monopoly law that went in effect, saying that each tractor company's tractors must be different or something like that. So, when that law went in effect, they opened up a new plant, and that new plant built the B-200 series. And the other plant changed Simplicity tractors so it looked different from the Allis tractors. Something like that. I'm sure that UCD or some others here will know the exact details.
During 1965, Allis-Chalmers purchased Simplicity. The federal government challenged the purchase. Due to the fair trade laws in effect at that time, the government claimed that Allis-Chalmers controlled too great a share of the market and thus limited competition. As a result, in 1967, Allis-Chalmers opened a new plant in Lexington, South Carolina to build garden tractors. The first models built there were the B-207, B-110, B-112 and HB-112. The B-208, B-210, B-212, and HB-212 were introduced in 1970. Simplicity tractors continued to be built in Port Washington, but for the first time there were differences besides paint and decals. In 1971, the 300 series introduced many design changes. The body was painted orange and the hoods painted cream, and Kohler engines were used for the first time. In 1973 the similar 400 series was introduced. These tractors bore little resemblance to the Port Washington built Simplicity models. The mower decks and many of the attachments were different. Also in 1971, the B-207 and B-208 were updated to the new paint scheme, but retained Briggs power. The 206, 207, and 208 were continued as the Homesteader series from 1972 to 1974. Also in 1972, Allis-Chalmers introduced the model 616, which was the Simplicity PowrMax with orange paint and a different hood. The 616 became the 620 in 1973 with the new 20 horsepower engine. In 1975 the 620 was relabeled as the 720 to match the numbering of the updated smaller tractors. To the best of our knowledge the 620 and 720 models are identical except that the later 720’s had an upgraded front axle. AC later came out with a second model 616, which was a painted over Simplicity 4216 and had no relation to the earlier “PowrMax” 616. During the Nixon administration, most of the fair trade laws were repealed, so in 1973 Allis-Chalmers closed the Lexington plant and transferred all production back to Port Washington. Once again, AC and Simplicity Garden tractors became identical except for paint and decals, although certain individual models may or may not have had an exact Simplicity counterpart. http://www.simpletractors.com/Main/history.htm

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Guest
The B212 has the 10.5" wide tires, the B112 has the 8.5" wide tires. The B212 has a soleniod ignition, the B112 has the higher voltage push button. There is a neutral shutoff on the B212, not the B112. Otherwise, I am not aware of many other significant differences. I like both, but really like the HB112. Edited: Also, the Mid-PTO has a different pulley which requires a different lawn deck belt (not sure if it's much more expensive). The steering change sounds nice. Not sure if the seat is really different, but you can advise us if it's original or not. I'd expect Maynard to provide sketches and pictures with arrows on them. hehehehe. And I'd thank him if he does!

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UCD
The early B-110 had a push button starter The later model b-110, B-112 went to a solenoid starter same with the tires. I have an early B-110 and it has a neutral switch as well as my later model B-112. The B-110 was a straight 3 speed short wheel base. The B-112 was either a 3 speed variable or hydrostatic and was lengthened 4". The early B-110 had a double hinged seat pan, the later models went to single hinge pans. The biggest difference in the B-100 series and the B-200 series was the hood, center PTO set up and the double V belt drive on the B-200 series mower deck. There was a kit available to covert this back to single V belt drive.

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Yes- it's possible... but I like to keep them original; then again to a point. If there is really something which was a major improvement... I might cheat; these are only garden tractors.
quote:
Originally posted by Ketchamized
So it's possible to just install a high voltage push button starter and take the solenoid out altogether? That sounds like it'd make the electrical system that much simplier.

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D-17_Dave
quote:
Originally posted by Ketchamized
So it's possible to just install a high voltage push button starter and take the solenoid out altogether? That sounds like it'd make the electrical system that much simplier.
Voltage isn't the differance. It would be a high amperage contacter switch. The neccessity here was the addition of a key switch to keep up with the industry standard and a way to incorporate the safety interlock switchs that were soon to be required.

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Ketchamized
Michael, Same here, I'm a purist too... But, at times I do make improvements and they're usually ones that you can't really see such as installing an electronic ignition module in place of points and condensor. Did that with my other tractor, and wow... Starts & runs much better. In the case of my tractor and the ignition system, I've been having a lot of problems with my electrical system, simply because I'm having trouble finding a short- there are too many wires for me to deal with... Used to Craftsman tractors with simple wiring. I'm going to be bringing my tractor into the shop to get that fixed. If the guys there can't figure it out, then out goes the solenoid and in goes a higher amp switch. Dave, That makes a lot of sense to me now. I was wondering why people would make something more complicated when it was simple & good enough to start with. Personally, I'm the type that believes if someone falls off and the tractor takes off, so be it... Curse, then get up & chase/jump on it and turn it off. All those safety switches just make things more complicated than it needs to be. :) I mean, how many times do I fall off? (Never have) And how many times do I have to deal with the wiring? (All the time)

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Guest
Ouch! Accident waiting to happen. I wanted to put a kill switch on these a while back, because if you get too wild with them... you can get hurt. That was after using a tiller I went on a wild tractor ride. I know of two incidents with tractors and older gentlemen (like 85-90 years old). I bought one tractor from a lady who told me her husband died soon after hitting a branch and breaking his lower back on his tractor. Then a college at work, has a father who's like 85 (supposedly a fit 85), he falls off his tractor and goes in the hospital. So after that I use the first story and tell her get him off his tractor. Then the only other story I hear about is a friend who had to save some guy who got pinned under his garden tractor. Anyway, too each their own. Be careful.
quote:
Originally posted by Ketchamized
... Personally, I'm the type that believes if someone falls off and the tractor takes off, so be it... Curse, then get up & chase/jump on it and turn it off. All those safety switches just make things more complicated than it needs to be. :) I mean, how many times do I fall off? (Never have) And how many times do I have to deal with the wiring? (All the time)

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Ketchamized
Michael, I was being scarastic in that message. :o) In all fairness, you're right, it's safer to have safety switches installed. They weren't called "safety switches" for no reason. :) I've always been cautious when operating machinery. (With the unique exception of doing wheelies on my grandfather's MTD Mastercut as a kid lol) Besides, I'm a bear of a man... I can't see a little garden tractor running over me. LOL (I am aware that my size & strength doesn't matter against the brute power of Allis Chalmers tractors) I'm profoundly deaf, and I am much more visually observant than the average person, and it does give me a huge advantage over the average person when it comes down to operating machinery. (I was a forklift operator when I was younger, and easily became the best operator over guys that have worked there for 20+ years) That's probably where my attitude comes from. At any rate, after reading your stories, it is clear that freak accidents happen. I am going to leave the safety switches alone on my Allis & Simplicity tractors. I didn't intend to take them out anyway, to maintain originality. But, my MTD Mastercut, of which I inherited from my grandfather- doesn't have any safety switches. After hearing your stories, they will be put back on. Thank you for sharing those stories and scaring some sense into me. :)

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