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Cast-Iron Briggs Idle down...

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Guest
Hey, I've heard it a number of times from people that you are suppose to always idle down your old briggs before killing the ignition. How much of an idle do you lower your machines to before killin the engine? One machine of mine has a sticky throttle cable, so I rarely idle it down all the way, but some.

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BLT
quote:
Originally posted by RayS
I always ldle my cast iron briggs all the way down. On my new kohler I have to shut it off at half throttle to full throttle or it will blow the head gaskets (been there, done that).
Ray, what is the reason for that? Thanks

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srwven
My father bought a brand new Deere back in the late 90's that had a 20hp kohler that would backfire after shutting down on low idle. He took it to the dealer, they replaced head gaskets, etc. Ended up at the authorized area Kohler repair shop and they had to rebuild it(I can't remember what they told my dad the problem was). We sold it shortly after that, so I am not sure if that lasted or not. I remember the Kohler rep. saying it was a common problem they were having at that time with that particular engine. Don't know if Ray's situation is the same.

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maxtorman1234
All of my Kohler and briggs engines, i let them idle for a couple minutes before shutting them off. I have never had a problem with either. If i shut the Kt17 off to soon, it will run on for a while.

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stevenj
I've had the throttle locked at wide-open on the B210 with the 10hp Briggs since 1971. It gets started at wide open and is shut off at wide open. Haven't experienced a single problem. No backfires ever. It seems to like a lot of choke to get it started when cold and sometimes even when its warm but other than that it's been fine. Always had trouble with the knob on the locking throttle cable coming loose and not being able to lock the throttle into position so we just locked it into position and forgot about it. On the other hand, the 17 hp twin Kohler fixture in my 17GTH-L likes to backfire if I shut it down at anything other than a slow idle.

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dirtsaver
Steven my KT17's are just backwards from yours. They backfire if shut off at less than 1/2 throttle. As far as the newer engines being reccomended shut off at higher speed, the manufacturers tell us that due to EPAs "clean burn" small engine regs, the engines run so lean and hot at lower speed and that's what causes backfire and blown head gaskets. We've seen an almighty lot of that in the shop the last few years.

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Ketchamized
dirtsaver, That's interesting... So, newer engines are better off being run at full throttle? Somehow, that doesn't make sense to me. Wouldn't the engine be under more stress that way? Does this apply to older cast iron engines?

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Ketchamized
richp, That's true, didn't think of that. Forgot about those fins on the flywheel. So basically, if there was an alternative cooling system to put more air onto the engine at lower RPMs, that would be even better? But, what about lowering the throttle before turning off the engine? Wouldn't that make the engine hotter before you shut down? So basically, people are better off just shutting the engine off at full throttle?

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richp
We had A Yoeman 648 with an 8hp vrtical Briggs. When shutting off, it would backfire if you didn't idle down first. Dealer said, combustion chamber would have hot spots and cause the backfire. Idling down for a few seconds would cool enough to cure the backfire. I have been idling down ever since (20 yrs.).

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maxtorman1234
quote:
Originally posted by Ketchamized
richp, That's true, didn't think of that. Forgot about those fins on the flywheel. So basically, if there was an alternative cooling system to put more air onto the engine at lower RPMs, that would be even better? But, what about lowering the throttle before turning off the engine? Wouldn't that make the engine hotter before you shut down? So basically, people are better off just shutting the engine off at full throttle?
THe way i see it is you create more heat while running at a higher rpm, so you need the extra air flow from the flywheel. At a lower rpm, less heat is generated so less air required. I would think that it is cooled equally when it is running slower as when it runs faster. Now overall heat is lower when it idles, so our Kt17 does not back fire or run on when shut off at idle. I know we all have different opinions, but this makes most sense to me.

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rjgoth
I totally agree with you Maxtorman. Less RPM = Less Heat = Less Cooling Required. Someone should get a temp gauge and measure head temperature at idle vs. at high speed. Ill put $10.00 on the engine running cooler at idle than at 3000 RPM. If you are having overheating problems first check to make sure all the cooling fins are not clogged. Ryan

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jdm
My Dad taught me to idle an engine before shutting off. Be it a farm tractor, lawn tractor, stationary engine, or any vehicle run down the road or interstate for any length of time. Seems to have served us well.

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jdm
For what it's worth, I've never had a engine bang after turning the key off. Both of my sisters' shut their mowers off quickly while hot and they usually pop. Similar engines all. Maybe it does no harm. I don't like it.

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