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LesH

Exhaust Hookup on a 2 Cylinder Briggs---

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LesH
I have a 2 cylinder side shaft 16 HP Briggs. On it I was going to pipe it up to have each exhaust port go to a tee then up to a vertical muffler found off of a Cub LoBoy. I am not reducing any of the plumbing from the engine , so I could not hurt nything ......could I??? I plan to support the pipe with a bracket, Thanks.

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dirtsaver
Les you should be fine. You for sure need to support the piping and the stack. Also be sure your piping is large enough that it does not restrict the exhaust flow. If you look at the existing piping(if it's still around) you'll see there are no true right angles like you'll have with plumping fittings so make as few bends as you can get by with and one inch iron pipe should be ok.

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Bunky
It should work fine aslong as you don't restrict the flow like dirtsaver mentioned, I have thought of using one of the Cub mufflers on a tractor I had but wondered how quiet it was going to be.. Also I would put on a Rain cap just in case you leave it out doors..

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D-17_Dave
quote:
Originally posted by Mick14
Does a right angle cause excess restiction ? would a "45" be better ? thanks Mick
The direction doesn't really matter. hat you need to watch out for is some muffler bending crushes one side of the pipe in to make a bend. A true manufactured bend will stay the same diam. throughout the turn. This is what is needed to maintain a good flow. The other thing to remember is the longer the path the exhaust must travel the more back pressure it will have due to friction. On a long run it's a good idea to go up to the next sized pipe to help with any unknown restrictions. Increaseing the pipe size will also slow the flow down and give the pipes and muffler more time to dissapate heat and sound before exiting the pipe.

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Roy
What the others said is all true. Generally, it is best to avoid sharp bends and make required bends as large a radius as possible. Anytime gas flow (exhaust) goes through a bend the flow resistance is increased. That's why they said to keep the bends smooth and maybe increase the pipe diameter.

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