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MPH

Paint cureing Ramblings

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MPH
Noticed this before, but never paid close attention to the fact. After I paint tractor parts I often lean them around the hot air vent coming off the wood stove to dry/cure. Doing the blade and now a set of rims for my firestone ags, two different brands of paint, as long as I leave the pieces there for about a week, they remain soft and just slightly tacky, if I move them to normal room temp they get hard and totally dry, if I move them back they get soft again. Had to dig out my old cheese makeing thremoeter to check the temp as I learned it's 135 degree air flowing outta there. My question is, am I getting a harder tougher finish by this long slow cure, don't matter or is the paint gonna peel off in large pieces?

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Willy
Hey Marty You'll be the first to know then you can tell us.}:):D I never heard of that happening,but once the reducer drys it should be dry,and if you had it near that much heat it sure ought to dry. Did you use a rattle can or mix it yourself? Hope you figure it out,good luck.
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Have a nice day--unless you have other plans

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MPH
Trouble is Jim, as hard as I use my tractors it wouldn't be fair to judge powdercoatting by me.:O. Once the finished picture is taken, everything I have becomes work horses, mostly asked to do a bit more then intended. I use rattle cans for all my paint jobs. Really starting to perferDuli-color over the rest, if for no other reason, thier tips work a whole lot better.

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rsnik
Hey MPH, Many rattle can paints, like the Rust-Oleum Professional High Performance Enamel "tough enough for industrial applications" (that I just sprayed the seat pan with) are basically a colored plastic, like acrylic plastic for example, with acetone or xylene as a solvent keeping the plastic in a liquid state until the solvent evaporates. Plastic does not bond to bare metal awfully well and a primer is a big help as an intercoat. The recommended primer for the paint has one job and that is to bond to the bare metal and also bond to the paint. Plastic paints bond well to the primer but not to bare metal. The best thing you can do is shoot the recommended primer on the bare metal first in terms of making the paint hang on tight and last. The paint probably gets soft when you heat it up because it is plastic and plastic gets soft when you heat it up and you probably still have some of the solvents in the paint that have not flashed off yet.

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B-16_IC
One tip I can throw in,(paint is my business;)) is to let each coat flash totally before putting in front of heat. If heat is applied too quick, the paint will "skin" trapping solvents underneath the surface. Basically making it like a good bagel, hard on the outside soft on the inside!

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