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portuncia

pulling mower deck spindle pulleys

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portuncia
I have tried the search funtion and all I get is errors, what do you guys use, my first deck it was easy, this second deck they are pretty rusted, cant get the jaws of the gear puller under it, or get them to stick in the belt groove. I might have to use a cutting disk or somthing to get it off there.

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MPH
Had mine soaked in Kroil for a couple days but my 3 jaw puller took them right off hooked in the groove. Only other thing I can come up with would be about 3 metal wedges pring under the pully then with the nut on a good wack with a BAH

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portuncia
yea my 3 jaw was useless. the pulley is pretty brittle so I ended up using a cutting wheel on a dremel to cut it off. Any Idea where I can get a new pulley

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Al
Hi, Hope this helps. Just getting ready to get this put on my website. Removing Pulleys From Simplicity Arbors. The old style arbors with the bearings pressed in have the pulleys held on with a nut. Getting them off is quite often very difficult without damaging them. Here is a method that usually saves them. If the arbor has the newer type stamped steel pulleys, DO NOT TRY TO USE A PULLER, ANY PRESSURE ON THE FLANGES WILL DISTORT THEM. Just a few thousandths of an inch will cause the belts to jump, whip and vibrate excessively. The following method has worked for me and I have probably saved 150 pulleys this way over the years. (I am not so sure this was smart, this is 150 pulleys I could have sold.). Step 1: Cut 6 pieces of 1/8 x ¾ or 1” x 3” long pieces of steel. Step 2: Remove the arbor from the mower deck (6 bolts). Loosen the nut until it is flush. Put the arbor in a press setting in a plate with a hole cut in it that supports the housing well so the flanges don’t get bent. Spray some carb or brake cleaner on the shaft and pulley hub. We use an arbor press and then press on the shaft. With the arbor press we can strike the press with a heavy hammer. Normally the shaft will slide down through the bearings and the pulley up on the shaft about 3/16”. Turn the arbor over and press the arbor shaft back up into the bearings. Now spray the pulley and shaft with penetrating oil. Next turn the arbor back over and take the nut off. By having the nut on when you break things loose if any threads are damaged on the end of the shaft, removing the nut will straighten them. If you take the nut off and a thread gets damaged you are trying to fix it to get the nut to start. It is much easier to let the nut do it. When the shaft has been pressed up, the pulley should be away from the bearings to the point where the bottom of the key contacted the bearings. Slip one of the steel strips in the gap on each side of the shaft between the pulley hub and the bearing. Repeat the first step, press down until the key hits the bearing. Turn the arbor over and press the shaft back up, Now put 2 steel strips on each side and repeat. Press the shaft down again. Turn over and press the shaft back up. Repeat with 3 strips. Usually the 3 strips are enough to move the pulley up into the threaded area and you can just lift it off by hand. Then you can remove the key and the shaft can then be removed or pressed out. If you don’t have a press, if you have a solid plate to support the arbor in you can put a heavy brass hammer against the nut and hit it with a heavy (6 or8 lb) hammer. Be sure the nut is on and you have the brass hammer perfectly flat against the nut. Once it is cracked loose, you can remove the nut so the pulley can come up. Just be sure the brass hammer stays flat. The bearings are already bad so pounding on them won’t make any difference. Next take a long punch and go down in the bearings and push the spacer off side and drive the bottom bearing out, going from side to side, turn over and drive the top bearing out. When reassembling, take one of the old bearings and grind a little off the outside to use the old bearing for a driver for the new bearing. Start the new bearing in the top of the arbor, lay the old ground down bearing on it and then a flat (1/4”) or more plate over the old bearing and press the new bearing in until it seats on the stop ring in the arbor. If you don’t have a press drill a hole in the plate and put a plate with a hole over the bottom of the arbor and use a piece of ready bolt to pull the bearing in. The reason you need the plate is that the old bearing is worn and have side slack. If you press on it the center will press on the center of the new bearing and damage the race in the new bearing and it will be rough from the start. By grinding a few thousandths off the outside of the old bearing it will not be tight in the arbor housing. Next put the washers and lower bearing on the arbor shaft, then the spacer and about 3 tablespoons of grease on the spacer and push the assembly into the bottom of the arbor and through the top bearing. Next push the assembly together. Install the top washers, and the key. Apply some “never-seize” over the shaft and key. If the old pulley it the cast one and has a set screw in it, throw it away. The new replacement pulleys have no provision for a set screw and they haven’t been used for 20 years. Supporting the arbor on the bottom of the shaft use a socket or tube and press the pulley down. Install the nut and tighten. Take a light hammer and tap the side of the arbor tube (about where the lower bearing is) on 3 or four sides to relieve any side thrust on the bearings. This small “jar” will cause the outer races to “home” if they have any side pressure. DO NOT HIT ON THE BOTTOM OF THE ARBOR SHAFT. Put it back in and feed her gas and grass. Al Eden

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firefoxz1
Getting mower decks back in shape is my main concern with these tractors being they are the best grass cutters of any machine out there. I started doing so many decks I designed a puller to pull the most stubborn pullies off without damage (so far), in fact I have used it to straighten some also being it fits so tight. This also works with the cast pullies. I drill a little dimple in the top of the shaft to keep the puller centered. [IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/kismar/Pulley%20Puller/HP068.jpg[/IMG] Clamping bolts not tightened all the way. put together just for the pic [IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/kismar/Pulley%20Puller/HP070.jpg[/IMG] [IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/kismar/Pulley%20Puller/HP067.jpg[/IMG] [IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/kismar/Pulley%20Puller/HP066.jpg[/IMG] [IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/kismar/Pulley%20Puller/HP076.jpg[/IMG] [IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/kismar/Pulley%20Puller/HP062.jpg[/IMG] With clamping bolts tighten they are completely recessed into the puller You can see that the puller can be used with a three jaw puller or a hub type puller with bolts. Designed from a bearing seperator puller. This puller cost me $100 to have made at the local machine shop but anymore can be made for about half that he said. Most of the cost was putting it down on paper (blueprint)(pat. pending). Best $100 I have spend in a long time.

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