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How does Positive traction work?

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Jack here,happyjack @ yahoo.com The non-slip traction hub has to capscrews or bolts with jam nuts on it. When these 2 bolts are tightened down the more tension that is put on a nylon sleeve that is on the inside of the hub that goes around the axle shaft when it is installed and thus the more pressure on the axle shaft, Its almost like having a brake on the right side that is connecting both wheels thru the axle shaft as as one. You can see this nylon sleeve with the hub removed and also you can see a brass bushing that sometimes wears out. This bushing sometimes can be replaced but not always depending on the model of the non-slip hub to which if I recall I have seen 2-3 different ones depending on whether it was a replacement one or what year of tractor it came off of. Point being is to keep it greased at least every 25 hours of use just like the other zerk fittings on your tractor but with wheel weights it can be a trying thing to do and also it the zerk fitting is mostly hidden. Now back to the hub: If you need to adjust one of these you first loosen the bolts and jam nuts and then re-finger tighten them. Then take a torque wrench and tighten them to 25 foot pounds. How you can tell if one needs adjusting is if one wheel just seems to spin endlessly and the other one just goes along for the ride. If you over tighten the hub you will notice that while trying to turn the front wheels they will want to go straight ahead. I run mine tighter in the winter months and I loosen it when the snow is long gone. The purpose being I really tighten mine down in the winter months so that I almost have a straight thru lock axle so that both wheels hardly slip at all. I know it hard on the axle tube and other drive componets but I stay off of hard dry ground while it is this tight. Come summer months I loosen it as I don't need all that much traction and its easier on the drive train. I never exceed the recommended 25 foot pound but mine is a fairly new one "meaning in great shade" and the 25 foot setting is very tight indeed. I can easily get by with 15 foot pounds come summer. You may have to play with the torque settings on one to get it just the way you want it to be. One other thing is that these hubs are know to "break" and they are nolonger availble thru Simplicity at least that I have found. So if you can find a good used one I suggest buying it or your tractor will be one wheel drive all the time unless you change the differenial over to the new non-slip one. I did that on my 64 Landlord and I still like my tension hub better that was on it. I think if you can find a new non-slip hub at a dealer the cost is around $100 and thats about what I paid for the new dif. I hope that I have not confused you if so just let me know "ok" and any others that can or want to correct me please feel free to do so thats what we are here for. Thanks and good luck to all, >>->happyjack<-<<

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GRANDERS
To expand on happyjack's good description, the older tractors had a free spinning differential with the hub tension described by happyjack, starting in about 1971 Simplicity took out the tension hub and added springs to the differential gears to provide the tension for "limited slip". The newer style works fine but has no adjustments. The newer differential also gives you better support for the right side hub (longer axle), so the differntial hub gear holds up better. MS

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