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drive pulley


D-boy

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The laws of inertia apply. The heavier it is the more difficult to accelerate it...that is to speed it up and slow it down takes more effort/work. And of course where the weight is concentrated also has an effect. Much the same as a flywheel imo.
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it IS a flywheel. whether that's good or bad "depends". If you've got a PTO clutch in between it may not be a good thing.
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OK here I go spilling out my stupidity If it is a fly-wheel then why do they not put heavier pulleys on the engines (other than to save a buck)?
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Because most engines all ready have a flywheel sized to the need of the engine and pulleys need to be different sizes to accommodate different attachment speeds.
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Thanks for the info The main reason I was asking was I have an old sears that I installed a wisconsin engine on and it has this three groove (4") pulley on it which weighs alot more than a single groove pulley and I was kinda dissapointed in the power it output so I thought that the extra weight of the pulley might be dragging it down.
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