Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

Sign in to follow this  
Mrgoodwrench22

muffler threads in block

Recommended Posts

Mrgoodwrench22
Does anyone have a goodway to fix the threads in the exhaust port on a briggs engine? I recently picked up a BIGTEN with a nice running 12hp briggs but the port is about stripped out, I've had some sucess in the past repairing the threads but I'm looking for new ideas and your experience with this problem. thanks from the sunny, nope its raining again coast of NC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
D-17_Dave
I've had some success using a pipe plug and cutting 2 opposite sides with a side grinder about a 1/4" or so deep with as close to a 90 degree angle on the leading edges and using this as a self made thread chaser. It will normally do a decent job of cleaning up bent or carbon filled threads so the new pipe will thread in and stay. If they are deeply stripped out this may be a waste of time but it's a cheap way to start. What can I say, I'm cheap.;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris727
My B-12's threads were pretty far gone so I had a short pipe threaded in as far as it would go and then tack-welded on, then threaded an adapter on so I can still replace the muffler, unfortunately this causes me not to be able to use the nelson type muffler because it sticks out too far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TomSchmit
Your local tractor parts store should have the type of flange that is used for bolt-on mufflers or pipes. This flange can be welded on to any muffler assembly so that it can be bolted on to the engine block rather than threaded into it. Tom in Milwaukee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
john-holcomb
I use a tap since I have one, but have done it Dave's way and it works. When you put the miffler in I have had good luck using teflon tape about 3 wraps thick starting a couple of threads back from the end. It seems to hold the muffler tighter and fills any gaps. Also if you have a pipe die run it on the muffler and cut 2 or 3 threads deeper since most NPT's are not threaded very far so they don't bottom out this will allow the muffler to seat a couple of threads deeper into the normally unused and undamaged threads in the block. I have used this method on 4 or 5 tractors and never had a muffler come loose yet and its been 10 years on the 3410. good luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MrSteele
I do a similar system to Dave, only I use the pipe I am going to thread into the engine, or the muffler, depending on the engine. I usually use a hacksaw blade to cut the grooves to assure a square cut on the pipe. When I thread it into the block, I tighten, and leave it in place. That usually lasts until the muffler is dead, then you get to do it again with the new muffler.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Qmetro
Alright be easy I am a new member. Just recently stepped into the world of tractors. My first luv Broodmoor 6008,then less than thirty days later picked up 808GT. Good start maybe ? My first stupid question . I would like to change the mufflers on them, both rusted. Most likley threaded on. How do i take off without doing damage. thinking a pipe strap to turn it with .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MPH
After you get the threads cleanned out enough to use, if your not already, a condut locking nut on the pipe help you to be able to lock it into the block without over tightening the pipe. Plus they seem to make removal a lot easier.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HubbardRA
Kwasi, I usually soak the thread area in Kroil for a few days, then just use a "big" pipe wrench. My 24 inch pipe wrench will usually remove them. I had one that wouldn't budge. I cut it off close to the head (left about 1/2 inch sticking out. This is needed in a later step), then I took my die-grinder with a small stone mounted in it and went inside to grind a groove in the pipe. When the groove was almost through to the threads, I use a drift punch and hammer to drive the pipe inward (hit the pipe sticking out that was left earlier) and break it along the groove. It then folded inside itself, got smaller in diameter, and came out of the hole. Threads were still intact.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BLT
Ir you can get in the pipe with a small piece of hacksaw, you can make four 90 degree saw marks which will happen to weaken the pipe so it will fold in and back pit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
B-16_IC
If it is a running engine, I have always had good luck working it for a while like mowing the lawn. Then shut it off and grab the pipewrench while the engine is still hot, (be carefull). Just my redneck expeirience, take it as such.:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

×