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tej

Mower deck rollers

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Stush
The new rollers that I bought had either plastic or nylon bushings in them. I still feel that the pvc tubing would wear good but I wouldn't lube with anything but a dry lube like so that dirt and dust won't stick or be atracted to it. Sounds like Bill is on to something with what he did to his rollers but I still like the idea of the nylon or plastic for the reason he stated about having to lube it everytime but I bet the bronze would wear like iron. But I have had the new ones squeak also though. To my way of thinking the cheapest and easiest is the way for me to go. I do like the idea of the rollers being only about 1-1/2" wide on my Homelite as when the tractor turns the rollers are all turning more being shorter then the longer ones that drag somewhat while going around a corner if that makes sense. Bill can you add more? I would be interested if Bill thinks greasing them before putting them on would work or if the grease would just be forced out while sliding them on. Those should last forever at least at the shaft part of it. I just wonder if it would work to counter sink holes for zerk fittings in the rollers themselves for greasing the rollers the way Bill has done or if the shirping is coming from the bronze bushing rubbing againest one another?? >>->happyjack<-<<

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tej
The rollers on my 42" deck are very loose on the shaft. Has anyone tried putting bushings in the rollers when they get worn? I was thinking that either brass or nylon bushings would give them a few more years of service at less cost than new rollers.

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Mack
"Stan" your message must have beat mine to the punch "posted while I was writing mine" or I won't have bothered posting mine as you answered at least my question. Now if it takes care of Tim's part of it as it was his post to start with. I was sure wondering if the pvc would work and what size to use also. It sounds like a winner and easy enough for me to do even. Thanks for your time, >>->happyjack<-<<

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carter
Hi Tim, Although I havn't tried it yet I have seen some pvc tubing at my local HomeDepoe that I thought would work well. My only problem would be figureing out how to drill the longer rollers out. But my homelite's rollers are only 1-1/4" long each so I don't know why the rollers couldn't be cut shorter on my Landlord and then it would be a breeze to drill them out. Just a thought that I have been having after replaceing them on my Landlord not to long ago after spending alot of $$$. Good to see your still around :} Take care Tim, Jack-happyjack

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christopher
Hey guys, I thought there were bushings in them. according to my parts manuals it shows washers between and a bushing on each end of the rollers? Am I seeing something else? Chris

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christopher
Hi Chris, Your write on the bushings. But on my older landlord the rollers that were on it didn't have the bushings whether from them wearing out or who even knows for sure. But the new ones that I bought for it does have the bushing you talk about. But once they wear out and then the shaft wears into the roller itself I think thats what Tim might be refering to but I could be wrong. Thanks, >>->happyjack<-<<

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christopher
happyjack, could you tell me what the bushings are made of,plastic or brass? I am in the same boat with my rollers and was considering replacing whole assy, but $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$. I was just starting to think after your message if a bushing could be fabricated with grease zerks or other method to help reduce wear? Just an idea. Chris

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christopher
On my last Sovereign with a 48" deck, I successfully installed bronze bushings in the rollers. Use a reamer the same size as the OD of the replacement bushing in a drill press to bore new holes into the rollers. I also had to oil the rollers prior to every mowing to prevent the bushings from squeaking.

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Stush
I have kept the rollers on my AC616 5ft. deck bushed with plastic pipe for years. 1/2" PVC (cold water only is a good fit on a 5/8" shaft). Your size might be different. Sometimes the roller is worn enough to drive the pipe clear through leaving 1/4" extra at each end. If the pipe does not drive clear through I cut it and dtive from the other end then cut again leaving 1/4" in. ea. end. The original bushings do not go all the way through either. I check each winter,(yeah right ha ha) to see if any need redone. This works for me until outside of rollers wear to where they are to small. Stan

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tej
I think the bronze bushings are a great idea, but take it a step further, use oilite bronze bushings. They are impregnated with oil, and just release it slowly as they wear. No lube required. Check McMaster-Carr or Grainger. Terry

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tej
Chris's response got me checking my parts manual. It looks like the 42" decks 2029933 and 2025033 did not have bushings. Decks 2025080(42") and 2025097 (48") had bushings.

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tej
Tim that very interesting, I checked my manuals for the 42" Mfr's. # 669 and the 48" Mfr's. # 670 and neither one takes the bushings. But my 1971 Homelite which is the same as the AC 300 and 400 series showing both the 42" and the 48" using bushings. My Homelite deck has been fitted with after market or home made bushing and that would explain why they are only 1-1/2" wide each. Good point as I didn't think of even checking that one out. Now I wonder if they are still available? I did look at one of my new rollers that I have as an extra and it also looks like the bushings are glued in also. Just maybe the pvc like others have stated would be the cheapest and easiest to replace with. Thanks, >>->happyjack<-<< P.S. Point being I could have just bought the bushings instead of the new rollers but the rollers were about shot anyway at least I can look at it that way ha :)

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tej
Jack, You are probably right about PVC being the cheapest fix. Those deck numbers I gave were AC numbers, I don't know what the corresponding Simplicity numbers would be. I got the AC numbers from the "B" Attachments Parts Manual.

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Sandy_Lake_Imp
Simplicity still sells the original bushings. They won't work though if your roller is worn too large. Bill

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Good_Ole_JR
if a person had access to a wood turning lathe, why couldn't he make new rollers out of some oak or other hardwood.I have been thinking about doing this. Any ideas about that? A local pallet manufacturer has lots of scraps that would be perfect fpr this use.

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Guest
Another idea that I tried and works. Do this if you have the time and and are short of cash. Don't throw away those used rollers. Try this method: For the really worn rollers if the outside is not too bad and the inside dia. is all elongated and the bushings are gone. Don't fret! First take the rollers that you want to save and file the burrs on the ends down to make them nice and flat. Now you can tell how long to make each roller shaft. Sometimes the roller sizes very when worn. Take a ( I think it was a 7/8 dia hole saw ) and weld an extension on it to clear the length of the rollers. Drill out the roller being careful to drill the hole as straight as you can through the roller. Get some ridgid 1/2 inch galvanized conduit. Make sure a 5/8 inch shaft can go through. Some times the conduit has different thicknesses of galvanizing and if you don't check you may have to ream the inside to accept the shaft. Cut the conduit 1/8 longer on each end then the roller is. Apply some waterproof glue to the inside of the roller and the outside of the conduit piece. Before the glue sets up tap the conduit into the roller leaving 1/8 sticking out of each end. Wipe off the glue from the inside of the conduit before it drys. The glue will keep the roller from spinning on the conduit as it wears. Put some Never-Sieze on the mounting shaft and inside of the conduit. Slip the rollers on to the shaft and cut spacers between them to suit. I recommend a new shaft as I have not seen a shaft that is not worn out when the rollers are. A new shaft runs about $75 and you could make one of 5/8 rod about $8 each. Weld the rod to the piece on the end as the original shaft is. Keep the best rollers on the end where the most wear is. Keep well oiled. I know of a mower that cut all of last summer with all of the rollers re-done like this and it should keep on cutting this year. If you have the time you can save big bucks and still have fun!! John

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Roy
Wood roller should work and shouldn't be too hard to make. If you can get you hands on some gum (gum tree) it has twisted grain that is almost impossible to split. They made wheels from gum in ancient times because it wouldn't split. New wood rollers with a PVC bushing would work even better. Roy

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Roy
Wooden rollers should work and shouldn't be too hard to make. If you can get you hands on some gum (gum tree) it has twisted grain that is almost impossible to split. They made wheels from gum in ancient times because it wouldn't split. New wood rollers with a PVC bushing would work even better. Roy

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tej
How about these ideas. Cast iron rollers so your deck can also be used for a lawn roller. Hollow rollers with perforations. You fill them with fertilizer and fertilize your lawn as you mow. Custom rollers with the club logo inlayed.

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christopher
has anybody tried to bore out the roller ends to install bearings? If the bearings were small enough they would wear for a long time. chris

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dlcentral
For about 9 bucks,get a piece of 3/4"X48" rod at the Depot,etc.If youre handy with a welder cut out,drill and replace the 5/8" shaft with the 3/4" not a hard job at all.Drill out the rollers to that size and you will have a roller shaft assy. that will be a LOT heavier duty[won't bend at the ends anymore!] and last far longer too.An old O.O.B. AC dealer told me this.I'm gonna do it next time I need a shaft assy. rebuilt.

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Guest
Only problem I can see with a 3/4 dia. rod is that without some kind of bushing between the roller and the rod then the roller will wear out fast. An example would be is when the original bushings go then the roller starts to wear and gets elongated on the inside. You are right about the 5/8 shaft bending. Especially after it starts to wear.

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