Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

disc harrow


dav

Recommended Posts

i have a model 990206 disc harrow. the pdf manual says to lubricate all bearings with machine oil. the wood blocks have a cotter pin sticking out of the back top edge. (part AD on the diagram) is this where the oil should be applied?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have one of those I was using until the wooden bushings rotted away. The part that needs lubrication is where the shaft runs through the wooden bushing. I think there is a metal sleeve bearing inside but can't see one in the parts diagram. I like to use grease rather than oil, a lot less messy and lasts longer, but you have to take the blades off and the shaft out to do it right. These discs generally don't see enough use to need frequent lubrication. I would say if it turns OK, then just take an oil squirter and shoot some around where the shaft goes into the blocks.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The blocks from the factory are what they call OIL SOAKED. Meaning the blocks are oil saturated. The cotter pin is probley the right place to fill them again and let soak in good. They should be made out of good straight OAK.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

come on now guys, you gonna still use wooden bearing, pull them apart and generously apply some bacon grease, then you make it actoss the great plains:D
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The wood bearings are still used in some farm machines. There is a place in Waterloo Ia called Waterloo Wood Bearing, They make them mostly from hickory, I used there scrap in my wood burner in the shop until they started chipping it up and sending it to China. Soak them up real good and they will last for ever.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good to know. I never knew you were supposed to soak the whole bearing, my disc had been left outside for years before I got it and the bearings were totally dry.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

i have started blasting all the bolts with PBS every time i walk past the harrow. when i get into it i plan to disassemble and paint everything. while the bearings are out, i will soak them in oil. question is; what oil should i use? 30 wt motor oil might be too thick to penetrate into the wood. should i go for something like Marvel Mystery Oil? or maybe a mixture of the two? if i can come up with a way to heat the oil without risking a fire, i think it will penetrate better than cold, ie air temp, oil. or should i just squirt some oil in where the cotter pins are and leave it at that?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't suppose you can buy one down there but a magnetic or a glue on oil pan heatter would work great for heatting the oil. I agree it would soak in better hot.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My brother worked in a machine shop in upper michigan about 15 years ago, and they got a job to rework the shaft and bearing blocks from a generator that was in a dam out west. They were told that it was almost 80 years old, and had finally worn out. And yes, they were wooden bearings. They replaced them with bronze, and the expected life for the bronze was 20 to 25 years. At low speeds, the proper wood with good lube is probably better than most modern stuff. Wish I knew what kind of wood it was, but sorry to say i don't. Steve
Link to comment
Share on other sites

hadn't thought of the dip stick style heater or magnetic one,either. but you're right; you can't get them here...leastwise i haven't seen any. not since i left new hampshire a few years ago. i will probably make a fire and boil water, then put oil in a smaller pan and set it in the water until the oil gets hot. will need a sacrificial brick to hold the bearing down so they don't float in the oil. hmmm...fire..don't have a forge but a fire would heat up a flatbar to try to bend to make a headlight bracket. hmm...two birds with one stone so to speak. i won't get to this until after next week's tractor show but i can see i need to give it some serious thought
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...