Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

Dual wheel adapters


johnmonkey

Recommended Posts

Good morning guys, a few years ago someone (insert name here______) posted a picture of dual wheel adapters that were made from 12" diameter pipe. Question- who posted the picture and how wide were the pipes? The reason I'm asking is that I have some 12" dia. pipe at school and want to cut it into 2.5" - to 3" wide wide pieces to place between the rims. Is tahta good width? Thanks jh
Link to comment
Share on other sites

John, Put a straight edge across the tire and measure inward to where the ring would contact the wheel. Double that (two tires) and add 1/2 to 3/4 tire clearance. This will be the width needed. By the way, If you have enough, you can cut a couple rings for me. I have been wanting to make a set of duals myself.:D
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Rod, I'm not sure if I can get the stuff yet. The guy who owns it, is practicing for welding certification. The piece is about 2 feet in length and I will need at least 5 inches. I hope to find out by Friday. I may check the local steel supplier, because we have a big horizontal bandsaw at school, so it will be easy to cut once I find a source. I just need to get the width. jh
Link to comment
Share on other sites

John, I just measured a set of 23x8.50x12 tires mounted on factory wheels. With these wheels the spacer would only need to be 1 1/2 wide. Make sure that the outside diameter of the tubing is approximately 13 inches. 12 inches is not enough. 12 pipe should be 12 inches inside, but I would suggest that you measure the pipe before you spend a lot of time cutting the pieces.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can't say you didn't try Rod;)
quote:
By the way, If you have enough, you can cut a couple rings for me. I have been wanting to make a set of duals myself.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Rod, The pipe is 12" inside diameter and about 12.75 outside diameter---Perfect:D:D. I think you're right about the 1.5 inch width, however, I may go 2" width. If the guy says yes, then I will cut you 2 of them as I won't be going over the 6 " max (not by too much anyhow;)). I will let you know. jh
Link to comment
Share on other sites

quote:
Originally posted by HubbardRA
Kris, John lives only about an hour from me. We are kinda like neighbors.;)
Lucky Dog^
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Rod, I did a little testing on the rim. I cut a block of wood 1.5" and another 2". The 2" piece looked like it fit better than the 1.5" piece. By the way, which way should the rim face? with the schrader valve facing out? If it faces inward, you won't be able to fill it with air:O. Can you run wheel weights with duals? jh
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just out of curiosity what certification is he going for? especially curious since he is practicing on 12" pipe. Benjamin
Link to comment
Share on other sites

John, You can mount the outer wheel facing either way since the contact point is the outer edge of the rim. It would be a good idea if the valve cores can be reached for keeping the tires aired up. When I measured the wheel, at 1 1/2 inches of ring width, there would have been only about 1/4 inch between the tires on the duals. 2 inches would give you about 3/4 inch. As far as wheel weights, I would mount them between the two wheels if they would fit. I would be afraid that the high inertia of the weight being on the outer wheel would tend to keep working the bolts loose. If the weights fit between the wheels, then use threaded rod to attach both the weights and second set of wheels. Install the threaded rod through the inner wheels with two nuts, one on each side of the wheel torqued very tightly. Slide on the weight and tighten it down with another set of nuts. Install the ring and wheel, then install another set of nuts to hold the wheel in place. If you could find carriage bolts that have enough thread on them you could put a set of them through with the head on the inside instead of double nuts.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure of the type of certification. Rod so you want 1.5" (if I can get the material?). I want mine at least 1.75". jh
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe you could use wheel weight carriage bolts and coupling nuts to hold the duels on, but if you can get really long carriage bolts I would just go ahead do that. Just a thought.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

AC_B-1Novice
JohnMonkey: Can you take pictures as you work and share them with the rest of us who are new to all this. That would be nice and maybe help more people for a long time to come. larry
Link to comment
Share on other sites

John, 1 1/2 is enough. If I see it needs to be wider, it would not be a problem to tack some spacers along one edge. That is easier than trying to cut one that is too wide. I want my tires almost touching when fully inflated.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

on the topic, but off just a tad. the out side duel is to be the same psi as the inner? I thought the out side tire should be lower 5 - 10psi to help with axle load/flex?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Rod "1 1/5 is enough" do you nmean 1- 1/2 is enough? By the way. We can get the material, however, the bandsaw will only cuts about 1/2 way and then has to be rotated. The piece has welds on it, so the bandsaw doesn't cut pararlell and it leaves jagged edges. In other words it will need to be grinded by hand to make the surfaces flat. What do you think? jh
Link to comment
Share on other sites

John, 1 1/2. If the saw does not cut straight, then give me some room for grinding and make it 1 3/4. 1 1/2 will only leave about 1/8 inch between my tires. I don't want them tight against each other. Nate, I want my set for mowing along the dam of my son's pond. I will need to have the outside ones pumped up in that case, for stabilization. The problem on a Simplicity is not the axle, since it goes all the way through the tranny. The problem with having duals is the leverage that the outside wheel puts on the bronze bearing in the right side hub There is only about a couple inches of bearing to counteract the length from the hub to the outside dual. That is a lot of leverage on that bearing. This bearing wear problem is the reason that I will only put the duals on when I need them. This is the reason I want a set of the ring-type spacers, since they are easier to install and remove than the ones that mount on the lug bolts.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

HubbardRA: I just wasn't sure on the pressures that are recommended. I will to be trying my duals this year and didn't want to replace my axle tube again is all. the farmer I work for in high school ran them a little low on the duals. that's why I was asking. by the way I have see the set up your building on others tractors, and originally thought of making the same until I seen how easy to make the ones I made. both are good Ideas for duals. love to see what you come up with. also if you weld a nut on the one side of the ready rod and use a washer. and then a small heavy duty spring with a washer on both ends and then put a pin threw the rod to secure the spring and then you can just spin the nuts on and off that hold the dual rim on. then pull the pin and it will release the spring. so you can just pull out the rod, it might be faster to take off, just a thought I had that might help out. the carriage bolts I have are 8" long, I used them on a my wheel weights witch must be to heavy for axle tube. there off a full size tractor, because I snapped my tube on the b-10 early pushing snow last year. witch will be the tractor I think I will be putting the duals on. so I'm looking for suggestions on the air psi.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

quote:
Originally posted by johnmonkey
We can get the material, however, the bandsaw will only cuts about 1/2 way and then has to be rotated. The piece has welds on it, so the bandsaw doesn't cut pararlell and it leaves jagged edges. In other words it will need to be grinded by hand to make the surfaces flat. What do you think? jh
Does the school have a metal shop with a large lathe or do you know any machine shop people? Wouldn't take long to get a true surface in a lathe.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the idea Mike, unfortunately I do work in the manufacturing lab that was designed better for math than a metal shopCCC. My engine lathe is made by Enco :O and is their smallest table top lathe (~6.5 x 12 long). It is a sad tale. jh
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nate, breaking an axle while pushing snow is usually due to the heavy torque loads on the axle. This is much more of a problems on a tractor if the clutch is used harshly (like popped suddenly) or with a hydro that is jerked in and out of gear suddenly. Sudden impacts will quickly break an axle or the drive tube. You never know what the previous owner has done to a tractor before you get it.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...