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cojo92

oh no...how can i get this off!?!?

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cojo92
on my b12 motor this is what the muffler to the head looks like. i PB blased it a few times and have let it sit all week. and then tryed to remove it with a pipe wrench and vice grips. no luck. C any suggestions? Thanks in advance!




Mike

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MPH
That's an ugly one. might try pouring coke on it,mstuff is quite a rust eatter. Also maybe if you cut it off in front of the nipple you could tap it with a hammer. Chisel the lock ring off to start with, it should split pretty easy, that should help to get PB to the treads of the pipe/block thinking about it.

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HubbardRA
You need to use a chisel and try to get that locking nut off before you are going to be able to rotate that pipe. If you try everything you can think of and just can't get the pipe to turn, then you can cut it off right at the edge of the block, then go inside with a hacksaw blade or small grinder and cut through the pipe. You can then drive one side of the cut inward and fold the pipe remnant inwardly till it gets small enough to come out of the threads.

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erancher
The first thing I would do before I tried anything else is to take a wire brush and clean off all of the rust scale. Second, why is there a lock washer on a pipe thread? Where they all done that way? If you are trying to remove the muffler due to the hole, put a backup pipe wrench on the collar and work to unscrew from there out. Use your PB Blaster and cheater pipes as necessary. Hook the backup on the bottom acting against the floor, block of wood or anything solid and stable. Push down (counter-clockwise) on the wrench loosing the muffler. Only leave about 15 - 20 degrees between wrenches when you apply force. This will keep things more stable. If it still doesn't budge, load the wrenches (and cheaters) and rap the loosing wrench with a sledge. This will introduce some shock which should help free it up. You may need some help if you use the sledge but remember, it's always best to be the person swinging the hammer than holding the object being hit. If you want to take the pipe loose from the block, after the descaling, I would use PB Blaster, a cheater and the pipe wrench. I would put the wrench on the lock nut and try to turn there first. If you are only able to back off the lock nut, at least it will give you good access to cleaning the pipe's threads at the block and to getting your PB Blaster further up the threads. It may also take some of the load off the threads. You can also load the wrench and use the sledge if you have secured the block correctly. If using the wrenches and cheaters does not work, then I would apply heat. If you get to that point, let me know. Also, watch what you cut off! As long as you have pipe sticking out, you have something to grab onto and turn.

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nateb17010
heat the pipe red and or a little hotter, where it's just about to puddle then take the heat away and let cool a bit. then when the color fades then hit reilly good with your PB blaster and let sit you can watch the PB melt in the metal. then after a hr + try again turning it out. it works just did it my self. but you have to clean the pipe and remove that lock collar. and the above all work as well. erancher: you know I don't have the correct answer for you, but with the heat and vibration that these tractors produce after all day of mowing they will work lose and fall on the floor. been there and replaced many, they do work.

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MPH
I believe the lock nut is a standard practice, For one, you don't have to screw the pipe into the block so tight. If the treads are clean I screw them in by hand the lock the nut good. But it MUST come off to get the pipe out.

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RayS
The lock nut is Briggs part number 691808. You can cut the lock nut with a sharp chisel then run the engine until it is hot, spray it with some penetrating oil. Work it back and forth with a pipe wrench and you shouldn't have much problems getting it loose. Keep applying the oil as you are working it back and forth.

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JimDk
Mike, Lots of good advise here. Do NOT use too much force on the pipe. You don't want to break the corner of the block. I have used Rod's cut and remove method several times. If you have access to a 1" pipe tap, use it to clean the threads after cutting out the pipe.

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RayS
quote:
Originally posted by Architectdave
Chisel the lock ring off and it will come right out..... you may bneed to split the ring also.....heat always helps as stated.
I have split several of those lock rings with a good sharp chisel and a hammer. That is what I was referring to.

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GWGAllisfan
Like others have said, remove the lock ring with a chisel. If the engine runs, run it for a while, then spray in penetrant, preferably the industrial type that wicks in well. Try the pipe wrench then repeat the process. Once the rust film breaks then it will be easy. If all else fails, cut the pipe and try to fold it back up into a heart shape, that should pull the pipe out of the threads. My opinion, freely offered and worth about that.

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erancher
I don't remember seeing a lock ring on the Kohler I rebuild last year and there is not a lock ring on the Kohler I am currently rebuilding. I did look at my '80s Kohler generator and it does have the lock ring. The generator has a round muffler like the B12. I knew I had seen it before but had never thought about why there was a lock ring on pipe thread. Only time I remember using lock rings was on electrical. Heating a part cherry red does change the molecular structure of the metal so be careful. It may not affect this application but I did change the characteristics of a die even when using a rose bud. We were down to that but heat does work amazingly well. Since I don't live near a machine shop, I have used the GWGAllisfan's "folding" method on GM A-frame bushings after pushing the rubber part out. It takes less time than driving to the machine shop and I don't have to wait around for the parts. My favorite method is to let some else show me "How it is done". So if you live near Houston, let me know and I'll come over but I will need you to hold the cheater pipe.

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plastikosmd
as others said..sometimes the heat will evap the oil before wicking it into the threads. I like to use that method with it running as it is usually hotter on the inside than out. If it is too hot and im not getting good penetration I will use wax over pb blaster. If it isn't a runner then torch away. Also bolt it to something solid if it is out of the tractor.

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Willy
Well you have enough advice getting it loose, all I would add is when you put it back together put some anti-seize compound on the threads and use the lock nut. Next time it will come off a lot easier.

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SimpleTom
Mike, I just had the same problem with my 16hp twin Briggs. I chose to cut the pipes off about 1/8th an inch from the block. Then I cut two small cuts into the pipe in the block running length wise until I got just to the threads. With a chisel I tapped the small section out. Then use the chisel on both ends of the leftover pipe so that it is a smaller diameter than the hole. You can then easily turn the small piece out by hand. I should have took pictures but I forgot. Here is finished pictures of what I was working on.


Tom

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