Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

  • Announcements

    • Kent

      Sign In or Password Problems?   10/09/2016

      If you can't Sign In, you need to reset your password.  Use the Forgot Your Password link at the bottom of the Sign In screen, and the site will send you an email to reset it. If you have an AOL email account, use the Contact Us link at the bottom of the screen -- AOL is intermittently blocking email from the site.
    • Kent

      Feedback Please!   10/28/2017

      See News and Announcements forum.
Sign in to follow this  
LesH

Tecumseh Engines on AC or Simplicity Tractors.....

Recommended Posts

LesH
On the AC and Simplicity tractors they did not use Tecumseh engines, correct?? Bolens used the Tecumseh OHV 160's quite a bit, I had a few and never had any luck with them-- as the valve lash adjustment was very critical. Anyone have any luck with Tecumseh??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dentwizz
I have never dealt with a tecumseh on a tractor, but thier other engines have left me much to be desired. From a mechanic's perspective they were an over-complicated nuisance compared to a briggs. They tended to perform a little more spunky, but only when they wanted to. At least the briggs would work most of the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
steve-wis
Simplicity used Tecumseh engines on the coronet rear engine mowers....I have one that I bought with a broken rod (quite common, they tell me). I overhauled it and it runs nice now, but for how long remains to be seen. I have never really liked them either. Some say on snow blowers they are the only engine to have, but I have a 1971 toro 421 with a 4 hp briggs that is still original, starts fast, and runs great. If I wouldn't have gotten the coronet for cheap I would have passed on it because of the tecumseh engine. Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MPH
I think the HH series engines like on my troybuilt are good engines, mine has been bullet proof, worked to death for 36 years, wore out two sets of rings and still no need to bore it. Little harder to work on because the oil pan don't unbolt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris727
I've had pretty good luck with them. When I bought my Homesteader it had been repowered with a 10hp vertical TVM220, it was good engine, I put it on a 728 that I sold and is to my knowledge still running strong. My grandfather still has a couple of 1960's toro 19" push mowers with tecumseh engines, they have been used to cut along a very steep slope, nearly vertical, still after all these years, little or no oil consumption and still reliable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cvans
I have a Miller blue Star welder with a 16 hp. Tecumseh OHV cast iron engine. I believe it is a 1980 build and it runs great. I had it overhauled years ago and it still is doing the job just fine. A Tecumseh engineer told me that these engines have way out lived their disigned life span. I'm not a big Tecumseh fan but this one has really out done itself. I have only adjusted the valves once since the overhaul and that was just to check them. I must be lucky;) Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
xenon172
Tecumseh made some good engines in the 60s and 70s. We have rebuilt several and they are just as easy to work on as a Briggs. These were mostly for snow blowers in the 7 hp range. At the same time we also did a bunch of Briggs 7hp engines. Both ran well and performed good. Both had their plus and minus points and for the most part of equal quality. The Tecumseh has a much smaller oil capacity than the Briggs leaving less room for operator error so they got a bad reputation for throwing rods. As long as the level oil is checked and maintained they should last as long as a Briggs. The only tractor with a Tecumseh in it we have experience with is a 5.5 hp in a 62 Wheel Horse. It is a Lauson which was owned by Tecumseh at that time and is a great little engine. We are also in the process of rebuilding a 6 hp VH60 which is a vertical shaft cast iron engine that seems well built and designed. Haven't run it yet but I will comment on it when we do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
steve-wis
I do have a V70 7h.p. on an Ariens Emperor that I am going to rebuild over winter. It isn't the original, it is from the mid 70's, but it looks good on it. Will post pics when it is done, the mower is the Emperor Deluxe VI, with fenders, hub caps, and a nicer seat that isn't in too bad of shape. I got it for $20. A bit of a sentimental buy, the first rider I ever saw or sat on was an Emperor Deluxe VI that my uncle bought new back in the early 60's. This mower is about a 62 model, near as I can figure. Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dirtsaver
quote:
Originally posted by MPH
I think the HH series engines like on my troybuilt are good engines, mine has been bullet proof, worked to death for 36 years, wore out two sets of rings and still no need to bore it. Little harder to work on because the oil pan don't unbolt.
I agree Marty,the HH series used on the old TroyBuilt tillers and their larger brothers that were on the Sears Surburban tractors were bullet-proof and easy to work on. Beyond that....I have an HH80 on a Generac genset built in 1986 that's still going strong. Don't care for their modern engines though! Larry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Vassal
The 8hp HMSK (Snow King) on my 1989 870 Commercial walk behind 'thrower absolutely rocks. It has exceeded all my expectations for this application and has never let me down. Wouldn't swap it for anything.
[img]http://www.interschola.com/template/itemimages/3000s/3536/erc123westernsnoblower.jpg[/img]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×