Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

  • Announcements

    • Kent

      Sign In or Password Problems?   10/09/2016

      If you can't Sign In, you need to reset your password.  Use the Forgot Your Password link at the bottom of the Sign In screen, and the site will send you an email to reset it. If you have an AOL email account, use the Contact Us link at the bottom of the screen -- AOL is intermittently blocking email from the site.
    • Kent

      Feedback Please!   10/28/2017

      See News and Announcements forum.
Sign in to follow this  
Roy

I Hate Painting

Recommended Posts

Roy
I hate painting!!!!!!!! Pictures are of the original seat pan for my 7013S. Put three coats of primer on, several episodes with body filler, and three finish coats. Despite all of this every pit, pimple, dent, minor imperfection, etc. clearly show through the finish coat. After the last primer coat and sanding the seat pan looked flawless. Put finish coat on and, surprise, all the defects magically reappeared. I HATE PAINTING. :(!






Pictures are as good as it's going to get. I'm tired of fooling with it. C Oh, failed to mention the heavy coat of gray and orange dust covering the entire shop and everything in it. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HubbardRA
You have to get rid of the flaws before painting. Paint will cover flaws, but not hide them.:O You also need to follow my philosophy. I no longer paint inside. My 713S was the last tractor parts that got painted inside. Too much overspray. Painting is now done only on dry days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
D-17_Dave
Beauty is in the eyes of the,,,,, well in the eyes of the last refrshing beverage you had Roy. Don't sweat it, you'll be looking at the hood while driving, not the seat pan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
firefoxz1
If you get rid of all the flaws it will be better than factory or maybe I should say not original:D. Don't sweat the small stuff as long as there is no rust and has a shine it would be done. If you see my 3012 up close you would probably gringesm02, but I like it and can say I did it all myselfdOd. [IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/kismar/3012H/20080818_00016.jpg[/IMG]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JimDk
It looks good to me, Roy. I had the same situation with my Homelite seat pan and hood. It must Murphy's law that causes it. My frame and dash painting went great, but when I got to the big parts that are seen readily, it was a different story. I built a spray booth to get rid of most of the over spray. It sucks out thrugh a double furnace filter. I have not had any problems with paint getting through. Luckily, I have room in my barn to store it when I'm not using it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
comet66
I'm sure it looks better to someone else than it does to you. You're bound to see more flaws than any one else. I use different color primer for each coat. Makes the flaws stand out more between sanded coats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
johnmonkey
I HATE PAINTING ALSO, but yours looks good from here in Accokeek. Think of this way, it's still protecting the metal:D. I'm certain that the tractor will look awesome. jh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SmilinSam
BODY FILLER?:OOO On a lawn mower??? All that work and perfection is OK ...if you are never going to actually USE it any moreXX(8 I mean I could maybe understand if it had a Kohler in it, be a "perfect" static display then;););)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
goatfarmer
quote:
I mean I could maybe understand if it had a Kohler in it, be a "perfect" static display then;););)
HEY! Don't you have a couple of those display's in your barn these days?;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DeltaBravo
I'm sure it looks at least a 1000 times better than it did. I've found lacquer primer shrinks over time and reveals every little imperfection. The high build primer I've put on cars (non lacquer) will hide a lot when wet sanded for the base and clear coat. Then there is the orange peel to look at.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OrangeMetalGuy
I found that it's not how it looks but how it feels. Meaning you have to feel for imperfections that you won't see. Just did my 716H's hood, I was upset with it because it wouldn't gloss the way I wanted. I ended up putting 8 thick coats on it before it came out the way I wanted. But, as others pointed out, from the factory it wasn't exactly super smooth... the spot welds show where the front of the grill housing meets the hood sheetmetal.. that's ok with me though. Apparently these weren't Concours class when they were made, so as long as it feels smooth to the touch and shines, that's a good restoration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dentwizz
When I do larger or more cosmetic items I always use a High build urethane primer. When you sand your filler prior, it should be at LEAST 320 grade. Prime over that generously(like 1 coat, wait til its almost dry, next coat). Let it dry thoroughly, then sand it with P400 grit and P600 grit. That is how we do it at my body shop and it is the only way we can get silvers and other metalics to work right. It is excessive for a solid like ours, but it nonetheless produces a good look.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

×