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fwo

Sat morning at Owenlea Farm

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fwo


This is my grandson, Don, age 11, working through some heavy grass with our 716.


We pretty much always blow everything on the tractors clean after mowing. Here is Don going over the engine.




Here is the 720 laboring up a steep grade on the way back to the barn. We had been trying to smooth a field where we intend to plant mums. This was actually Friday, yesterday.


Here is my old trailer again. We are still planting hanging baskets. We planted 500 more today. We have sold 610 finished baskets to date with about 3500 more to sell.


Here is another shot of my old trailer today. Horses are a monumental pain in the neck but do have the advantage of unattended operation. That is, you can tell them when to stop or walk and left or right without actually reining or even being very near. Handy but hardly makes up for all the drawbacks.


Here we are today preparing ground cover for mums. We plan to have five pieces of ground cover each 15 feet by 300 feet. That will be 5500 mums in pots.


Here are two pieces already installed.


Here is the area for the water and fertilizer tanks associated with the mums. My brother's cows in the background.


First time out for this mower in 2009.


A small wagon load of lead weight drippers for the mums.

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Simpleton7016
How thick is the ground cover? I see some shoeprints on it, so it looks ok to walk on. I have been using rolls of 4'x35'x 5/8" converyor belt in my garden. I bored 2" holes every two feet or so and dropped my seeds in each. I had the most bountiful garden of my life (by a long shot) last year and didn't need to weed at all. However, that conveyor belt (though nice to walk on) is heavy as heck to roll up every fall and unroll every spring. Your ground cover looks a bit lighter, but just wondering if it can withstand foot traffic for several years or if it will break down over time. Great picks though! Thanks.

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fwo
# Are strickly flowers or do you grow and sell veggies to? Actually, I'm a dairy farmer but the cows have been gone four years. We estimate that I have put a milking machine on a cow between three and four million times. But that's all over now. Our principal agriculture activity is in the marketing and agra-tourism category; the Homerville Produce Auction is located here on my farm. However, I do grow vegetables. I usually prefer fall decorative such as Autumn Wings and pumpkins. We also do fall cabbage and late yellow squash and zuchinni. I also do a few acres of watermelon and cantalope. We have about 1000 Mt Fresh tomatoes in the greenhouse which I may plant or I may sell depending if some local grower loses his to frost.

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fwo
Ground cover is thin woven fabric about as thick as a feed bag. It is extremely tough and will stand up to daily foot traffic for many years. I have some in daily use for 12 years that was installed over gravel and it shows no wear except where we turned on it with a skid loader. It comes in rolls from 3 to 15 feet wide and 300 feet long. However, you wouldn't usually plant through ground cover except for permanent crops like raspberries. Plastic mulch for gardens is usually black, comes in rolls 4 feet X 6000 feet X 1 mil, and costs about $120.00 per roll. It is almost always used in association with drip line. Plastic mulch is extremely tough and will definitely stand up to foot traffic for one full garden cycle. Plastic mulch is fairly difficult to lay by hand (but not impossible).

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