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pungo

Rebuilding the Cast Briggs 10

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pungo
I finally began the quest toward rebuilding my 2010 Landlord engine.Luckily I found a Machine Shop that cares and knows these things.I still like to "Hold the Repairmans Hand" by looking up the proper numbers, providing a Briggs Manual, etc.I am amazed that all of these parts can be ordered, though the piston brought up a "This part will be available in 20 working days" message.The Model 243431 block will be bored 20 over, new 20 under rod, new springs, valves,guides,gasket kit and carb kit,Magnetron conversion kit, and Governor/Misc. springs.295 bucks, I hope it is worth it. If needed( and you can afford it) a new crankshaft(159 bucks) is available, as well as a new cam, crank bearings and Governor gear. Can anyone here tell me what I may be missing to get this thing right?

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HubbardRA
A rebuild is usually based on the problems the engine had to start with. When I rebuilt my 243431 engine, all I did was replace the rings. That was 20 years ago and it is still running great. I only replace the parts that are out of tolerance when I do a rebuild. I never did see the reasoning in replacing everything, when most of the parts are still in good working order and within factory specs. In other words, if it ain't broke (or worn out) don't fix it.

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pungo
You are correct Hubbard. Except I tend to get fanatical about silly stuff sometimes!:IThe engine was running but burning oil, I let an old timer tear it down because he had the proper puller for the flywheel and he showed me egg-shaped clearance producing piston slap. The Machinist measured it and recommended the bore job, as well as turning the crank, probably because I told him "I wanted it right"( dangerous words). I read all the horror stories of thrown rods and having no knowledge of how many hours this engine had on it decided to play it safe. The exhaust valve is a given but the intake is probably overkill, still, the Machine shop is going to grind the new ones to size and install for me. The Briggs manual recommends a lot of these procedures, especially proper valve guide replacement. All in all, the engine was in great shape considering its' age and I want to use it hard when done.

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MDB
That should be one sweet running Briggs when you get it done. I have done several major overhauls like what you are doing and other times just rings or a valve job. when needed. As Rod said, if it's not broke (or wore out) don't fix it.

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pungo
I appreciate it! Tell me, should I just emery cloth the crank, hone the cylinder, put new rings in it and let it be? I used to rebuild engines in the late 70's and back then the mindset was if it was tore down you might as well do it right so you didn't have to go back in. Of course, those were Chevy 283, 327, the occasional Ford 390. Are ya'll saying Briggs engines are more forgiving? Could I get by with an out of round cylinder just by replacing the rings? Like I mentioned in an earlier Post, sometimes I get fanatical about Projects. The guy at the machine shop recommended replacing the roller bearings and I said no, they appear to be in great shape. I do have some judgment as to what is overkill, I just want to do it right, the engine is the most important part.

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Chris727
Do I understand this right, is $295 for parts or for everything? Are they using genuine briggs parts or aftermarket? If they can rebuilt it "right" for only $295 I'd go for it. Parts alone are probably $200. Another thing to watch for is that when converting to magnetron, sometimes a kit alone will not suffice. In some of the older engines the flywheel polarity is different. Briggs and Stratton will replace the magnets for free but you have to pay shipping on the flywheel.

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pungo
That 295 dollars turned into 365 dollars Chris, that is just Original Briggs parts.The machining will be around 85 bucks with them installing valves, I will do the rest. Yeah, everything is high, but the way I justify it is; I don't want a replacement modern engine, I don't want this one to be halfway done. The Magnetron kit I ordered was an original number from the 243431 Parts sheet so it should be correct. That new 20 over piston was the bear, Briggs didn't have it so instead of 84 dollars I found one in stock at 106, plus seperate tax and shipping.I tried several of the Site Sponsors but may have missed one who had it in stock. Restoring these tractors is kinda like my previous endeavor, vintage wooden boats/outboards. Boat means Bring Out Another Thousand!

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HubbardRA
Pungo, Rules are the same for all engines. If it is still within factory specs, then there is no need to change it. If the cylinder is egg shaped or severely tapered, even if it is smooth, it needs boring. The engine, itself, determines what needs to be done. If you put everything back to new specs, then you would hope to get another 30 or so years out of it. If there is some wear in the cylinder and you just install new rings, you may only get another 15 or so years out of it. It is always a judgment call that you (the owner) will have to make. For instance, B/S now only sells a .020 oversize piston. If you bore it now, that will be the last time you can do it. If you can get by with a new set of standard size rings, then you can perserve the option of boring the engine for a later rebuild, if necessary. If the engine smokes under heavy load, it is usually a problem with the rings/bore wear. If the engine smokes when the throttle is closed quickly, that is usually wear of the valve stems and guides. These are just some of the things that I look at when working on these engines.

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powerking_one
Phil, If the bore is out of round more than .002" or worn/tapered more than .003", then Briggs recommends boring the cylinder (not to mention if it is scored). If you are putting on a Magnetron coil or conversion module, you'll need to get the flywheel re-polarized (returned to Briggs). I assume this is the orginal engine circa 1965 (look at the Code #)? Not doing this would blow a big hole in your "wanting to do it right" philosophy otherwise. Tom (PK)

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Dark
done right is a very expensive sentence: 1.bore /hone cylinder 2.flux the head for stress cracks 3.plane the deck and head for matching 4.refresh/Tap all bolt holes 5.new valves/seats/guides/springs. 6.check and straighten crankshaft 7.bushing bearing clearances and replace seals. 8.inspect/replace governor as needed (stress/Heat Damage) 9.re balance engine counter weight for over size piston as needed. 10.gasket and seal replacements 11. new fasteners and lock washers torqued to spec as applicable. hmm... did I miss anything I think everything else would be induction systems or electrical.

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pungo
You ain't kidding!I can get by without new valve seats, governor parts( though I have new springs), the crankshaft is true,I'll check on balancing and milling head/cylinder. Then there is sending the flywheel to Briggs(thanks Tom), rebuilding the carb, new plug, oil,air cleaner elements,engine paint,decals,various wiring harness, fuse,belts. Add two hydraulic hoses (for the Hydrolift,70 bucks)4 new tires,a seat of some sort(cover or reupholstery)body paint(6 bucks a can),hood and misc decals,new choke cable, 90 weight oil,and I could have bought a new Poulan!

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powerking_one
Phil, I'd say Mark's (DARK) rebuild points are on the extreme side (IMHO). If you were rebuilding a 10,00PRM drag racing engine then maybe he's on the mark. Of all the garden tractor engines I've rebuilt over the last 35 years, I've never had to replace valve seats, springs, mill the block/head surface, straighten the crankshaft, rebalance the counter-weights, replace all of the bolts (yeah maybe new lock washers). Chasing/cleaning all of the tapped holes is a good idea. If it is an L-head motor w/aluminum head, then check it for flatness and mill it down if needed. Stick to and address the basics here: Cylinder/piston/ring wear, crankpin/rod journal wear, main bearing roughness/wear, valve face burning/wear, valve stem & guide wear. Definately replace all of the "soft parts" (gaskets, seals, etc). No one wants a leaker after spending all the time & money doing the rebuild job. Tom(PK)

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