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John_RI

Guidance with briggs rebuild

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beamer
Pull your plug and turn it over if you dont have any air(compression) pushing against your finger youve got problems. Pull the head off and see if the pistons and valves are moving as they should. You may have broke your rod at the crank. Good Luck

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John_RI
Last Fall my 8hp briggs (200421) in my 725 stopped with a big clunk! I've decided to see if I can get it back into ‘running' shape for minimal cost. I've not taken it apart yet but I'm sure the piston isn't connected to the crank. The crank seems to turn fine, I feel some resistance - valves? and see the points open & close. I'm looking for advice as to what I should look for to determine if there's an easy fix for it or not. Any suggestions will be appreciated. Thanks, John(ri)

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John_RI
Thanks for the help. The advice was not what I wanted but was pretty much what I expected - you're absolutely right (it's just the Yankee in me!!). I looked up some prices for the rod & piston and it seems they are considerably more than parts for a mod 19 - I'm thinking it might be because there weren't many 20's made? Anyway, I also have a mod 19 that has been outside for the past 20+ years that I'll take a look at. The blower housing is shot, but I'm hoping the one from the mod 20 will fit if needed. Thanks, John(ri)

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SimPete
Once you've got the engine out, torn down, inspected, and new gaskets purchased, is an "easy fix" really easy? It sounds like you've got broken stuff in there alright. After ya spend on those pieces, how much more do ya really have to spend to get stuff to do an overhaul? You really wanna run those new parts ($) on "sanded" surfaces? To me, its enuff work havin to go inside the engine anyway, so ya might as well to it all while your there. The only thing ya can say for havin to go back inside a year or two later is "at least ya have some practise" Ats just my approach though. Good luck, Pete

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SimPete
There's no substitute for actual "real world" experience. You'll never find the "tricks of the trade" or short cuts in factory manuals. I'm sure there are guys in this club who have rebuilt 100s of small engines, know the "tricks" and what does not have to really be to "spec". I am NOT one of those guys. I would take Pete's advice. Why throw good money away? Get a manual and read it thoroughly so you at least know the technical terms. Take your engine apart and find a friendly small engine mechanic. Ask SPECIFIC questions. Most knowledgable mechanics don't mind "talking shop" and giving advice if they don't feel like they're wasting their time or being taken advantage of.

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