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CharlieVoda

10h Squire Frame Break

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CharlieVoda
Here we have a case of the damage a 10 h Briggs can do when the bgb frame bracket weld breaks. The tractor hinged upward about two inches when this occurred and believe me it was quite a 2 or 3 second ride. Damage sustained; Drive shaft bent in center and at both ends. Shift, brake and lift rods all kinked about 1". Bolt bent about 1/2" in cast engine drive coupling. Both fiber and the rubber shock disk were shattered or broken. Lift arm with chain pulled off the rock shaft. Front right hanger on deck yoke broken by axle. I will need to check crank and BGB to see if they are bent. The bottom weld is just keeping things togehter. I have included links to strengthening the bgb frame connection to save someone else the need. Sure wish I would have done this. My Squire may now be the official parts machine for my B110 w L10 loader, B 10, Big 10, MW Squire and Simplicity 725. I have not decided if I will fix it or not. This has been my primary 2 acre mower for four years. Thought you guys might enjoy the first hand pics. [url]http://www.simpletractors.com/club2/topic.asp?ARCHIVE=true&TOPIC_ID=9666&SearchTerms=BGB%2Creinforcement[/url] [url]http://www.simpletractors.com/club2/topic.asp?ARCHIVE=true&TOPIC_ID=9173[/url]








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Chris727
Ouch! Thats some major damage! By the way, do you happen to know what brand those wheel weights are in the 2nd picture? Thank You. -Chris

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CharlieVoda
They were on the Montgomery Wards Squire 10 tractor when I bought it. Does anyone know if some of these tractors were orange when produced as there was no trace of gold paint anywhere so I repainted it orange. I have never taken them off in the last 2 years but I suspect they will be coming off in a few days if they are identifiable I will post.

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SimpleTom
Your Squire appears to be just like the model 700 and 725. It would have been orange as well. The Squires that were like the Landlord 101, 2010 would be gold/bronze in color. Tom

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Burntime
I bet the bgb and motor are fine, looks like the discs and driveshaft took all the abuse. Sorry to hear about the mishap. Better then a 3000rpm chunk of metal finding your legs or something worse!

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garryvh
I know this is going to sound like a really ignorant question, but is this a common failure? How many others have experienced something like this? The modifications shown on the archived posts are impressive, but represent a significant amount of work and I am reluctant to undertake something like this. Was the machine subjected to unusual stress? I again apologize for asking such basic questions, but this is the first time I have ever seen this type of failure. Garry VH

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Simpleton7016
Whoa....looking at that driveshaft, I might consider wearing a cup in the future. Are there any SimpleTractor branded cups in the gift shop?

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CharlieVoda
The only stress was mowing about two acre of lawn 5 or 6 months a year. My b11o w loader takes all of the extreme and unusual stress around the place. If you guys send me your cup sizes I can see what I could come up with. Back to the serious side of things, I to would like to know how common this problem is. I do not believe it is all that common. If it was I would suspect there never would have been as many tractor sales as there were in the past for Simplicity and Allis. Maybe it is because it was a Montgomery Wards. LOL I am going to talk to my buddy who is a professional welder/ inventor and all around improviser and see what ideas we come up with to strengthen the frame area without all of the intense fabrication if possible that is involved in the above links. I am a bit concerned about my loader setup as that has not been beefed up either.

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ReedS
The frame failure is somewhat common on the later Landlords, not so common on the earlier models, must be the extra 3hp! I have seen more than one frame repair to this area. My early LL bears the scars of a just such a repair. As of yet I have not had a problem with my loader tractor, however it is a later Sovereign and if you look closely you'd notice that the frames were changed in this area on the later tractors.

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goatfarmer
I bought a 7016 that had thrown the driveshaft. It was a hydro, but the plate between the seat, and the dash, where the shifter on a 3 speed goes, was bent up good. Bet it scared the krap outta whoever was driving it at the time.yell

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dirtsaver
Just a guess(from personal observations)this is not a common mishap but many times this occurs in conjunction with loose or missing front BGB bolts. I've learned to check those bolts on any tractor I consider buying and recheck them twice a year on my working units. Larry

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HubbardRA
My 61 Wards was not gold. It was (like the 700 & 725) red. Looked nothing like any of the oranges that I have seen on other Simplicities and ACs. Most of those bent parts, including the driveshaft can be straightened and re-used. The frame can be welded. Looks like all you need to buy is a couple bolts and a set of flex disks.

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CharlieVoda
All bolts on this one were tight this was a definate weld failure. Yes I am going to repair it. It does definately look worse that it really is.

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dentwizz
It looks like a fatigue based failure. Because the metal is as thick as it is, the failure will be in the joint. A simple fix for it would be to weld angle Iron inside and fill the gap with weld. I bought one a while back where they welded externally and it looked pretty hacky. Inside is much more sensible and doesn't violate any cosmetics. This is not however a basic repair. If you are not a competent welder(I am not, I would have a friend do it) find someone who can. If it is not welded propperly you will have a recurrance later on. Done right, you will be passing it on to your heirs before it will break.

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dentwizz
I should also add, the cracks are never sudden occurances. The failures can seem abrupt, but they take a long time to weaken the structure. It is somewhat moot now, but for those who do not know yet, look at your welds often. The time to catch and repair is when a crack is an inch or less. If you do not clean your welds and inspect than you are inviting a massive failure such as this. I am not insulting anyone, merely warning the rest of us to prevent what is a costly and potentially dangerous situation. It is more likely to occur with heavy use of lifted implements, but fatigue is a collection of small and large 'hits' until it simply cant take it. This crack was most likely visible for at least several months if not a year. Hindsight is an unforgiving teacher. I wish you luck.

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CharlieVoda
I will have a professional welder do the repairs. I am sure the weld has been weakening for quite some time. Good idea to check welds it is an easy thing to overlook in the maintenance schedule. Thanks to all.

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