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country

Mang tiller, broken chain, swiss cheese

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country
I tore into the Mang tiller today. I looked over the engine real good today, and found more missing than the shroud. The governor linkage is also missing, and note the interesting throttle spring.


The governor, or at least whats missing.


The fantastic throttle linkage.


The missing shrouds. The only thing there is the flywheel shroud, and it's been patched.


This is the plate that the engine mounts to. It's swiss cheese now, since the engine has been changed a time or two. I'll probably try to replace it.


This is the inside, nice heavy shafts and chain drive mechanism.


Here is another shot of the inside, showing one of the drive lock mechanisms.


Here is the other drive mechanism.


Of course, there had to be a broken chain inside to. I'll have to replace it. There is no harm done to anything else. This certainly turned into more of a project than I anticipated. There are more engine parts missing than I would have liked. I certainly didn't want to have to replace a chain, but that's the way it goes.

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dentwizz
Interesting up and away exhaust. Some of those tillers are a pain. That looks like a better one. I did an American Yard Products in the summer that I ended up cutting a front plate out of and making a bolt-in plate to access the belt pulleys. I would have welcomed chains like that.

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B-16_IC
I've gotta say, you've come up with something there. I thought I was a tiller fanatic and i've never seen one before!:O Always another around the corner.

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country
Another 4 hours worth of work here. These are commercial units, and most of them were rentals. It's definately heavy duty. The only drawback I see is that it is single speed. I think I could solve that issue by using two separate pulleys on the engine if I wanted.


Here is the drive shaft. Enough PB Blaster finally released it so I could get it out. You can see the parts here. The sprocket doesn't move, but the other part slides on the shaft over the key.


Here is the shaft showing the collar and the sprocket. You can see how they lock and unlock.


Here is the shaft in the locked position.


You've heard me say heavy duty over and over. Here is what the wheel hubs look like. Note the automotive style lugs, which are 1/2".


Another one of the hub.


Looks like I'll have to replace two of the four chains. This one is rusted pretty thin.


Here is one of the bearings. That's about half paint and half rust. There are 3 shafts in the main housing. I have 2 of them out, and all four bearings are seized up. I suspect the third shaft will need bearings as well. That also means I'll need to pull the tines off and inspect the bearings for the tine shaft. These darn bearings are really going to add up ($$$). What I thought was free spinning bearings before ended up being bearing spinning in the housings. When I get new bearings, I'll have to see I'll need to make new housings, or if I'll be able to reuse these housings. I suspect these housings are now wollered out, because the bearings shouldn't spin, they should have a slight press into the housings. So much for a cheap project, but when I'm done, it should last another 30 years. It definately won't be done for fall tilling, since I found all the bearings will need to be replaced along with two chains, the cost is really going to go up. The plan now is to have it finished for spring.

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country
Here is another update. I have it completely torn down now. There are signs that it was orange originally, which is also what another owner told me.


Here is a shot of the internals again. This is a close up of the assembly that rides on the splined shaft.


Another shot of the internals on the splined shaft.


Here is the splined shaft. I was hoping this would be in great condition. The splines are in good condition, but....


This is what one of the two keyways looks like. I suppose I'll have to try welding it up and recutting the slot for the woodruff key.


This the large pulley driven by the engine. I had to be creative to pull it. The puller is home made, and actually what I use for flywheels. It has been very handy on this project. Since pulleys are too weak to pull on the outside with a puller, I drilled two holes right next to the collar and put the bolts through the holes. There is also a plat on the back....


That looks like this. The two cap screws thread into the plate, as there wasn't enough room for nuts on the back side. It worked great. All in all, the tear down is done. One other shaft I didn't get a picture of has wear from one of the sprockets. The sprocket has bronze sleeve bearings that I'll replace also. At this point, I'm repairing one shaft, reusing one shaft, and replacing 2. I'm also replacing all 8 bearings. I still have to rebuild or replace the cover plate, and work on the tine housing. It has many tweaks from it's years as use as a rental machine. One question for you all. When I'm rebuilding these shafts, is there any reason to keep the woodruff keys as opposed to using square keys and longer slots in the shafts?

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