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lilbucksht

Oil for winter

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lilbucksht
I was just searching for posts that would recommend an oil for my 10 HP Briggs. I am getting it ready for winter,(1st time) and I have been using SAE 30 non detergent stuff from NAPA. It looks like there are alot of opinions when it comes to oil, has there been a poll on this topic? I have been reading quite a bit here but still dont know which will be the best for my Briggs.

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steve-wis
Lots of options, but get the 30 wt. out of there for cold weather. If you use a straight wt, use 10. I personally use 10-30 year round. Some say there is more consumption with multigrades, but for the little bit I use my tractors, it isn't an issue. I do use Amsoil synthetic in my cars and love it. I don't use it in my old engines because synthetic sometimes will bypass the seals in old engines and I don't use mine enough to benefit from the longer life anyway. I guess it is more personal preference, but DO use the proper viscosity whatever you decide. Steve

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HubbardRA
10W-30. I use it year round with no major oil consumption. I have a small lawn and do not have the temperature problems that are prominent with the long run times of the larger lawns. Same with plowing snow, since my driveway is only 50 feet.

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PhanDad
I agree you don't want straight 30 wt in winter, only way I'd do that is if the tractor was kept in a heated area. I use 5-30 in the winter and haven't had any issues.

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dirtsaver
I use either regular 10w30 or synthetic oil depending on the tractor. Several years ago I tried Castrol Syntec 10w30 in the 17GTH-L for winter and was suprised at how easy it started at 10*F. Fired up like it was 60* and didn't even need to preheat the engine with the heatlamp overnight! Larry

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MrSteele
My 16HP Briggs likes oil if I run much less than 50 wt in the summer. I do not plow snow, but there is hardly a week that goes by without it running, usually grinding leaves or keeping the weeds knocked back in the yard. We do not have harsh winters in north Alabama as most in the club do, so I rarely run less than 30 in it in the winter. Multi-wieght oil goes through as if there was a leak somewhere besides the rings, any time of the year.

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Dark
Oil Recommendations To optimize engine performance, (Disclaimer)(use Warranty Certified Briggs & Stratton Small Engine Oil). Briggs & Stratton offers a Synthetic 5W-30 oil that provides the best protection at all temperatures as well as improved starting with less oil consumption. For optimum performance, you should change the oil in your small engine after the first five hours of use and then annually, or every 50 hours of use (whichever comes first). Use Briggs & Stratton SAE 30W Oil above 40°F (4°C) for all of our engines. Check oil level regularly. Air-cooled engines burn about an ounce of oil per cylinder, per hour. Fill to mark on dipstick. DO NOT OVERFILL.


Oil Recommendation SAE 30 40°F and higher (5°C and higher) is good for all purpose use above 40°F, use below 40°F will cause hard starting. 10W-30 0 to 100 °F (-18 to 38 °C) is better for varying temperature conditions. This grade of oil improves cold weather starting, but may increase oil consumption at 80°F(27°C) or higher. Synthetic 5W-30 -20 to 120 °F (-30 to 40 °C) provides the best protection at all temperatures as well as improved starting with less oil consumption. 5W-30 40 °F and below (5 °C and below) is recommended for winter use, and works best in cold conditions. Type of oil to use Use a high quality detergent oil classified "For Service SF, SG, SH, SJ" or higher. Do not use special additives. Choose a viscosity according to the table above.


REGARDLESS OF OIL BRAND ALWAYS READ THE DONUT !

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Chris727
Even in the summer, I would use detergent oil in that tractor. The non-detegent is more of a specialty oil, I think for very old cars and farm machinery, I think it had something to do with the oil pumps? Anyone know?

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Dark
quote:
Even in the summer, I would use detergent oil in that tractor. The non-detegent is more of a specialty oil, I think for very old cars and farm machinery, I think it had something to do with the oil pumps? Anyone know?
Detergent Oil Virtually all modern multi-weight oils are detergent oils. Detergent oil, cleans the soot of the internal engine parts and suspends the soot particles in the oil. The particles are too small to be trapped by the oil filter and stay in the oil until you change it. These particles are what makes the oil turn darker. These tiny particles do not harm your engine. When the oil becomes saturated with soot particles and is unable to suspend any more, the particles remain on the engine parts. Fortunately, with the current oil change intervals the oil is changed long before the oil is saturated. Non-detergent oil, such as SAE 30, is not used in modern passenger vehicle engines. It is still used in some gasoline engines such as lawnmowers.

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goatfarmer
Non Detergent oil is also recommended for things like air compressors, where you don't change the oil very often, or have much contamination from the likes of combustion, etc.

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