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Synthetic Oil

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Simplicity_728
So I dumped some 10w-30 synthetic in the 8hp on the 728 and so far i'm liking it. It does alot better on gas now:D. Is there really an advantage of running synthetic in these older style engines? (mines been shortblocked)

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Dark
Oil Recommendations for Briggs To optimize engine performance, (Disclaimer)(use Warranty Certified Briggs & Stratton Small Engine Oil). Briggs & Stratton offers a Synthetic 5W-30 oil that provides the best protection at all temperatures as well as improved starting with less oil consumption. For optimum performance, you should change the oil in your small engine after the first five hours of use and then annually, or every 50 hours of use (whichever comes first). Use Briggs & Stratton SAE 30W Oil above 40°F (4°C) for all of our engines. Check oil level regularly. Air-cooled engines burn about an ounce of oil per cylinder, per hour. Fill to mark on dipstick. DO NOT OVERFILL. Oil Recommendation SAE 30 40°F and higher (5°C and higher) is good for all purpose use above 40°F, use below 40°F will cause hard starting. 10W-30 0 to 100 °F (-18 to 38 °C) is better for varying temperature conditions. This grade of oil improves cold weather starting, but may increase oil consumption at 80°F(27°C) or higher. Synthetic 5W-30 -20 to 120 °F (-30 to 40 °C) provides the best protection at all temperatures as well as improved starting with less oil consumption. 5W-30 40 °F and below (5 °C and below) is recommended for winter use, and works best in cold conditions. Type of oil to use Use a high quality detergent oil classified "For Service SF, SG, SH, SJ" or higher. Do not use special additives. Oil Recommendations For Kohler 10W-30 (Command Oil)(Disclaimer) is recommended for Command, Courage, Command PRO, Command PRO CS, Triad OHC, and Aegis engines for temperatures above freezing (32°F, 0°C). SAE-30 is an acceptable substitute if temperatures are above 50°F, 10°C. K-Series and Magnum engines should use SAE 30 (Magnum Oil) above freezing. 5W-20 or 5W-30 can be used in all engines when temperatures are below freezing. For more complete oil specifications refer to your owner's manual. For optimum performance, Kohler's special blend oils are available from your KOHLER dealer. Synthetic oils meeting the classifications listed in the owner's manual may be used, however oil changes still need to be performed at the recommended intervals. To allow the piston rings to seat properly, Kohler recommends operating a new or rebuilt engine for at least 50 hours on standard oil before switching to the synthetic oil. REGARDLESS OF OIL BRAND ALWAYS READ THE DONUT


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Storm7012
I know I'm kinda new to the small engine thing, but I've always ran SAE-30 year round. Not saying its right, but an old guy that knows his stuff told me that a long time ago.

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UCD
quote:
Originally posted by Storm7012
I know I'm kinda new to the small engine thing, but I've always ran SAE-30 year round. Not saying its right, but an old guy that knows his stuff told me that a long time ago.
He Doesn't know as much as you thought. It didn't apply then and doesn't apply now. (It would in the deep south where it doesn't get below 40°F) 30 weight oil at 40°F and below is to thick to provide adequate lubrication at start up cold. The colder it gets the thicker it gets and harder to start..

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Storm7012
quote:
Originally posted by UCD
quote:
Originally posted by Storm7012
I know I'm kinda new to the small engine thing, but I've always ran SAE-30 year round. Not saying its right, but an old guy that knows his stuff told me that a long time ago.
He Doesn't know as much as you thought. It didn't apply then and doesn't apply now. (It would in the deep south where it doesn't get below 40°F) 30 weight oil at 40°F and below is to thick to provide adequate lubrication at start up cold. The colder it gets the thicker it gets and harder to start..
How is it he had a Big Ten that stayed together for 20 years before the first rebuild? Just luck? What happens when the engine gets hot. Even at 20 outside, the engine will still get warm and the oil would be to thin, wouldn't it. I really would like to do the thing that will keep them running the longest.

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UCD
Engine MFG's recommend 5w - 30 10w - 30 oil for winter use for a reason. 5W - 30 weight oil = 5 weight oil at 0° and 30 weight oil at operating temp. Synthetic is even better. With 5w - 30 oil at 0° the engine will turn over like it had 30 weight oil in it at 60° and the oil will flow to lubricate bearings. At 0° 30 weight oil is like sludge and the engine will turn over very hard if at all and when it starts will starve for lubrication until the oil warms up. 30 weight oil transfers heat better in an air cooled engine in the summer than multi viscosity 10W - 30 oil. There for a cooler running engine. Multi viscosity synthetic is equal to or better than 30 weight Dino oil

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RayS


This decal that was on a air cleaner cover I have. I had this decal reproduced when I restored my Deutz Allis. The decal was on a 326437 (16hp). The decal contradicts my operators manual for my 326437 engine. I use 10w 30 synthetic in winter and try to change it back to 30w in summer. I have had the 10W 30 in year round with out problems, but i alway keep an eye on the oil level. I just wonder why they made that decal diferent from the operators manual.

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Simplicity_728
Ray, the 12hp briggs i/c i have has the same decal on it yet the manual says 40 degrees or higher SAE 30 and doesn't say 10w-30 etc for summer

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RayS
Is that chart for the newer OHV engines or would it apply to all engines that they ever produced. I know that they didn`t have synthetic oils 40 years ago and that oils have more than likely improved over the years.

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steve-wis
I knew a farmer who swore only 30 weight in his tractors year round, and that was in upper peninsula of Mich. He had Minneapolis Molines. I helped him overhaul all three, one of them twice. Thick oil at startup in cold weather=overhaul. I run 10-30 year round here in wisconsin, but am considering going to 5-30 synthetic. I run it in both of my cars and love it. Just was a bit afraid of the really older engines leaking when changing to synthetic, but might just do it anyway. I use Amsoil. The guy who started Amsoil was one of the guys designing the synthetic oil for the air force, if I remember right, got to think he knows what he is doing. Steve

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xenon172
A lot of the older engine and tractor manuals recommend the oils that they do simply because those were the best available at the time. Synthetics weren't generally available or proven yet. The idea that older engines might leak is simply because the synthetics flow into more areas to provide better lubrication of hard to reach areas and will find their way through old and deteriorated gaskets and seals before Dino oil will. They don't cause leaks but rather point out a problem earlier than conventional oils do.

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Michiganmobileman
Very interesting information. When you guys refer to the synthetic oil, is there a specific "small engine" grade or just regular automotive oil? As the garden is tilled and the drive ready Tis time for the fall change on the girls and I think I may try the synthetic. Greg

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Storm7012
Okay, now what happens when we get a warm spell in say March and you get out and do something with your tractor. Lets say it's like 63 out that day and your still running 10w-30?

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Simplicity_728
i was running dino 10w-30 at 65 degrees with no problems. I have the last printed copy (2003) of the 19000 series(8hp)B&S owners maual and it says you can run synthetic 5w-30 or 10w-30 all year round....that's why i switched

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Vassal
Storm said: "Okay, now what happens when we get a warm spell in say March and you get out and do something with your tractor. Lets say it's like 63 out that day and your still running 10w-30?" That's where the "30" in 10W-30 comes into play. Remember we're talking about MULTI-Viscosity oil here, it is suitable for a WIDE rande of temperature conditions. The same oil is suitable for BOTH instances (Winter/Summer) within reason. Follow the mfg's recommendations and bob's your uncle. 5W-30 10W-30 The cold end: 5W = "W" for WINTER 10W = "w" for WINTER and so on.... The hot end: -30 -40 and so on.....the second number tells you the warm viscosity. Does this help at all?

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Storm7012
Okay, I know how the stuff works, W=winter. If its thin at 10 degrees then it stands to reason it would be thinner at 60 degrees, right?

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Vassal
Nope. While a multi-vis oil, say 10W-30, may flow easier at a low temp it should have the aprox warm temp flow potential of a straight 30 weight oil. Granted, there's a lot of science involved in this, but that's the basic concept and the premise behind using a multi viscosity oil. Sure, you're looking for the compromise with a multi-vis oil and I'm sure there is one, but for our purposes, it's unlikely we'll ever see it as long as we stick with the mfg's guidelines. (My opinion of course).

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Vassal
Back on topic, my opinion is that synthetics are vastly superior in all applications and conditions (that's 'cuz I'm using my dipstick johnny). Furthermore, I could care less what brand it is, I just (try to) do as Dark recommends and check the donut. I just picked up a gallon jug of Rotella synthetic 5W-30 for $19.99 at AutoZone (regular price). If you guys can do better for less, send me some, I'll use it :o)

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UCD
One caution. With multi viscosity Dino oils 10w - 40 is not always better. It will break down at high temps before a 10W - 30 oil will making 10W - 30 oil a much better choice at high temps. It don't make sence being the 10W - 40 weight is supposed to be thicker at higer temps but it is a proven fact.

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