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RUMBLEFISH

46 Dozer Blade

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RUMBLEFISH
Im looking at a 46 Dozer blade for my Big 10. The seller says it dosn't have the control rod and he uses a chain to lift it. Are these things that I can make up easy enough? Also are these connected to something else on the blade that has to be their to make the rod work. I just want to make sure that I dont drive for 4 hours round trip only to find out I'm missing other parts. Thanks:)

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RUMBLEFISH
Thanks Burntime. What about the control rod ? I know it has a bracket that goes on the frame but what does it attach to on the blade? is it just a L bracket with a clevis to the blade or something more? Thanks

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Burntime
I could snap a pick for you tomorrow...if I knew the 169 number it would be easy to send you the manual... Blt seems to have all those:D Paging Bob, Bob to the forum...

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JJ MARSHALL
go to EBAY & OTHER ADS on this site and click on simplicity landlord riding tractor blade & sickle stroll down through pictures there a 46 blade . JJ

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dentwizz
It is easy to make a really nice lift link. I made one out of 1/2" rod with two sections of 1/2" fine thread rod welded to the ends. Threaded Yoke-ends thread onto that and make a very classy adjustible setup. I should note, go to a supplier like Fastenal or Mcmaster-Carr not simplicity as they will be a pretty penny if you go to simp. The rotator rod is easily made also, there are projects listed. I didnt use any U-joints or special parts on mine either. I will be posting show and tell on the ones I just made soon.

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stevenj
quote:
Originally posted by dentwizz
It is easy to make a really nice lift link. I made one out of 1/2" rod with two sections of 1/2" fine thread rod welded to the ends. Threaded Yoke-ends thread onto that and make a very classy adjustible setup. I should note, go to a supplier like Fastenal or Mcmaster-Carr not simplicity as they will be a pretty penny if you go to simp. The rotator rod is easily made also, there are projects listed. I didnt use any U-joints or special parts on mine either. I will be posting show and tell on the ones I just made soon.
No welding is required. Use a 1/2-20 thread die and simply thread the 1/2" dia rod. Depending on the particular tractor and engine combination, you might have to add a bend or two onto the rod to clear the engine but do this before you figure out the overall length and thread the rod.

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dentwizz
I realize you can die it, but it is not something that I personally have equipment or patience for. Much easier to weld when using harder rod stock. It should be noted that when determining rod length, you should move the lever back away from the lock when the plow is on the ground. Otherwise when you lower it in use it could get locked in the down in an awkward moment(like a curb edge).

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Ishmael2k
quote:
Originally posted by dentwizz
It is easy to make a really nice lift link. I made one out of 1/2" rod with two sections of 1/2" fine thread rod welded to the ends. Threaded Yoke-ends thread onto that and make a very classy adjustible setup. I should note, go to a supplier like Fastenal or Mcmaster-Carr not simplicity as they will be a pretty penny if you go to simp. The rotator rod is easily made also, there are projects listed. I didnt use any U-joints or special parts on mine either. I will be posting show and tell on the ones I just made soon.
Doesn't this eliminate the spring tensioner that the OEM lift rods have? If so what doe you use to keep the blade in contact with the ground and still absorb the shocks?

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dentwizz
The heavy shocks are absorbed by the trip springs, but the ground contact pressure is maintained just as simply by making the rod slightly long to preclude the down-lock position of the quadrant and using a slightly light counterwieght. The spring tensioner is not actually made to take up very much movement anyhow. In practice I find the non-locking system to be more intuitively controllable, especially when dealing with curbs and sidewalks.

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Ishmael2k
quote:
Originally posted by dentwizz
The heavy shocks are absorbed by the trip springs, but the ground contact pressure is maintained just as simply by making the rod slightly long to preclude the down-lock position of the quadrant and using a slightly light counterwieght. The spring tensioner is not actually made to take up very much movement anyhow. In practice I find the non-locking system to be more intuitively controllable, especially when dealing with curbs and sidewalks.
Yes I know that the plow trip springs are for heavy horizontal "shock" (actually more for abrupt stops) but from my experience if you have any amount of uneven ground to plow the tensioner will take up the minor vertical shocks and allow the blade to stay in better contact with the ground. By adjusting it correctly I have the choice of no down pressure, some down pressure or locking it to all down pressure. I just watch the amount of spring that I take up as I lower the blade. (Actually it is all be feel now as I have used it for years this way.) To my knowledge this is what it is for. I can see using a no adjust system if you have little to no uneven areas but with what I have to work with it would be ineffectual and/or end up bending rather quickly.

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