Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

Sign in to follow this  
Terry_Hart

BGB Oil Change

Recommended Posts

Terry_Hart
How often do you change the gear oil in the BGB. I have a Sovereign with an 18 hp Kohler and changed all the other fluids this weekend and didn't see a drain for the BGB? Also what do you use for gear oil?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OrangeMetalGuy
On mine, there is a drain plug on the side facing the transaxle. If you don't have one you will have to loosen the cover itself to allow it to drain. Use SAE 90 wt gear oil in the BGB.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PhanDad
As stated above, on the newer tractors, you have to loosen the rear cover plate to drain the fluid because there isn't a drain plug for the BGB. It's messy and the cover will weep for awhile, I speak from experience. I didn't replace the gasket. The recommended fluid for the BGB on newer tractors is "multi-purpose powertrain oil" (hydraulic/transmission oil), same as used in the Sundstrand hydros. Older gear boxes used 90w gear oil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pungo
I have used Dow Corning Gear Oil Additive in a Red Belly 8n Ford gearcase with great results as far as shifting-chatter-noise reduction. Then again,STP oil treatment is also great in worn gearcases like Volkswagon transaxles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DanD
I have Mobil 1 75W-90 in the BGB on my 7016. Used it because I run the tractor in the winter for the snowblower. Of course all the BGB does on mine in the winter is run the hydrostat pump as the blower itself runs off the front PTO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MPH
I've used Syn gear lube in all ,y BGB and trannys since I got ,my first one, like 8 years ago. I use either Amsoil 75-90 or Valoline since I can buy it here in Tok.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Terry_Hart
I went out and checked the BGB, no drain plug in the rear plate. I guess I will have to get a gasket and drain it. Then re-fill with synthetic. I still need to figure out how much to add.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BobT
In a previous discussion of bevel gear lube, some people felt that the bevel gears held up better when lubed with 80-90W rather than multi-purpose fluid. They indicated the change to multi-purpose fluid during production may have been more for convenience than longevity. I use synthetic 80-90W in my bevel gear box (per the manual recommendation).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HubbardRA
I run 80W-90 in all my tractors including the AC 716H and 713S. I know a guy who rebuilds automobile transmissions. He eliminates the tranny fluid and uses a mix of 80W-90 and motor oil in the newer 5-speed trannys for automobiles. He told me he saw a lot of wear with the automatic tranny fluid, but had gone into several that he had changed over, after a few years of operation, and the wear was essentially non-existent. He said automatic tranny fluid would get you 5-10 years max in a 5-speed, while a mix of true oils will get 20-30 or more years of wear. He said that still didn't fix the loose nuts behind the wheel that usually break the trannys.:D We have put the oil mixture in two different 5-speed trannys, and they work great and appear to shift much easier with the detents feeling more solid. I know this was a little off topic, but I was trying to illustrate the benefits of using the oil, instead of automatic transmission fluid which has friction modifiers to make the clutches in the auto tranny hold better, but can also cause bearing and gear wear in manual gear boxes. Keep in mind that today factory units are only designed to last for five years. Long enough for you to fall in love with the unit, so you will buy another when it breaks. Nowadays most people will replace rather than repair if the unit is five years old or more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×