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RUMBLEFISH

Well I did it.

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RUMBLEFISH
This is the first time I have ever done something like this. I'm a little nervous about this whole thing but feel confident that I can get the help I need from members on this site. Here are a few pics of my Big 10 and what I got done today in a few hours. [IMG]http://i46.tinypic.com/5caaf9.jpg[/IMG] [IMG]http://i47.tinypic.com/zjf4gp.jpg[/IMG] And the engine. [IMG]http://i49.tinypic.com/wwdcfb.jpg[/IMG] What is the best way to do something like this. Do I just work on the engine then go thru the front end then the steering or just take it all down? I dont want to get all messed up so just looking for pointers on how others have done this. Thanks

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LPH-5
Hello Rick, Manuals on the tractor & Engine will help out a lot, and answer a lot of questions, But I would write notes and make pictures (or even take pictures) to your self on how it comes apart, & work on one assembly at a time like engine & steering and etc. That way it less confusing, than taking it all apart in one shot, I see by your workshop you have fixed things before, Good Luck, and have fun doing it..

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johnmonkey
I use lots of zip-lock bags with a sharpie. I replace nuts and bolts in their original holes. I use masking tape to label wires etc. Take pictures and write notes as stated. What is your overall mission? are you going to to a total tear down and re-build? looks good so far. jh

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RUMBLEFISH
Well the engine runs good but smokes just a bit after it's been running for a while. So I think I'm going to pull the head clean it up new gaskets top and bottom.I did a compression test and it was around 90psi so I think thats ok. The steering really needs to be done over since its got lots of slop in it then hit the front end and replace whatever is worn out. I'm going to remove all the panels and just leave the frame and trans. Then my plan it to paint eveything as close to spray can original as possible. Then rewire add the lights with a bar a member sold me get all the dash stuff working right and hope I dont have a bunch of nuts and bolts left over. I have 2 decent decks and a snowthower for the tractor also. But Im not going to touch them until this is done.

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Vassal
I'm trying to apply the same habits I've developed working with cars to my first tractor 'attempt'. As mentioned, the key is organization, this way if you get distracted or your project gets side lined, you can always go back and start again without having to remember every fine detail of the project. Although you will repeat a lot of steps (degreasing, repairing, refinishing, etc), I think this sub-assembly process is the best because it keeps the project manageable. Here's how I attack: Whenever possible, I do the initial take-down from the top down to keep it a rolling chassis as long as possible. I do this by first attacking sub-assemblies (engine, dash, etc) and depending on the size of the project and the project goals, some of the sub-assemblies might be stored intact for future diassembly or re-installation as-is with only minor clean up. No matter what, I do as others have mentioned and try to reinstall fasteners after the sub-assemblies have been removed. Many of the assemblies will also have loose parts like harnesses, brackets, etc. and I try to box all the stuff up together and label it with the name of the sub-assembly ("Big 10 Front End"). I also rely on labeled zip lock bags to keep the small bits in order. Keep focused on the details and I'm sure Big will turn out a perfect "10". sm06

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sbull78
looks good so far!!!that is what i am in the middle of doing with my 7012...i tried to put all bolts together in jars with labels and masking tape wires with sharpie on them and take pics with my phone so i know where the heck it all goes after i forget!!!:D

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Willy
Where is the sprite of adventure? Take it all apart throw everything in a box and shake it up,then after(if) you get it back togather you will know your tractor inside and out.:D:D Have fun with it,that what it's all about. Good Luck

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Dark
In my shop we tear down allot of tractors and equipment everything from cub cadets to custom racers. each station is set up with plastic container bins with labels. Frames are stripped down and parts are binned, tins have their pictures taken and posted in front of the bench on the station. wire ties and labels for parts are used also each with the ser# of the tractor it belongs to.

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Architectdave
I take pictures as i disassemble things like steering or hubs etc. Anything that has multiple assembly steps gets pictures as each piece is removed. When i get an assembly apart, I will take a picture of the entire assembly laid out on the bench or shop floor so i know all the pieces and that order they were in. You will do great just be confident that if you hit a dilemma to can always keep trying till you get it together right.

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timflury
quote:
Originally posted by johnmonkey
I use lots of zip-lock bags with a sharpie. I replace nuts and bolts in their original holes. I use masking tape to label wires etc. Take pictures and write notes as stated. What is your overall mission? are you going to to a total tear down and re-build? looks good so far. jh
I could not agree more! A careful teardown is of the utmost importance!!

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sierradriver
I'm doing a big ten right now and I tore the whole thing apart at the same time, keep posting pictures:D it will help me. Just kidding but do take pictures and label, best advice. Looks good.

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xenon172
Pictures, pictures, pictures, lots of pictures every step of the way especially of the more complicated areas like linkages. Keep everything labeled in bags or containers. Don't hesitate to ask questions even if they seem silly, they aren't. Get the best manuals you can find and above all else have fun.

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RUMBLEFISH
Well I started to take the engine down and here is what I found.I guess its really no surprise due to the year. [IMG]http://i46.tinypic.com/fmo3o.jpg[/IMG] And the piston and valves before and after a little cleaning. [IMG]http://i49.tinypic.com/2010hhf.jpg[/IMG] [IMG]http://i48.tinypic.com/2iik574.jpg[/IMG] And a pic of the cylinder walls. Do they look ok or not. I really have no idea. [IMG]http://i48.tinypic.com/2iik574.jpg[/IMG]

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RUMBLEFISH
Woops sorry about the double picture. Here is a pic of the cylinder wall to take a look at. What does everyone think?? [IMG]http://i48.tinypic.com/353ayw9.jpg[/IMG]

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jmh21586
Looks like you evicted a mouse. And right before Christmas.:( I think the cylinder walls look fine. I'm hoping you post a lot on this rebuild. I'm going to do the same thing with my newly aquired 7012. But I'm going to use it for snowblowing this winter so my rebuild will have to wait till spring.

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johnmonkey
I think you are supposed to get the inside diameter of the cylinder top and bottom and 90 degrees apart to see if it is egg shaped and it should be +- .01 (not 100% sure of the tolerance), but it is in the manual. jh

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RUMBLEFISH
quote:
Originally posted by johnmonkey
I think you are supposed to get the inside diameter of the cylinder top and bottom and 90 degrees apart to see if it is egg shaped and it should be +- .01 (not 100% sure of the tolerance), but it is in the manual. jh
What type of guage should I get? Also do I just keep adding to this thread as I go thru the process or should I start new ones as questions come up?

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Chris727
Can't really say how good the cylinder is just from a pic. I see an "S" stamped on the engine, could that mean this engine was sleeved at some point, kind of looks like it might havce been going by the more visible ring around the top of the bore. Gaskets alone probably won't stop your smoking. Potential causes: Dirty breather, worn valves and/or valve guides, worn rings, worn cylinder. Check your valve clearance too. You'll need a briggs engine manual if you don't already have one, one of the mid 1990's or earlier editions.

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RUMBLEFISH
Before the tear down I did a compression test and got about 90 PSI.Like I said this is the first time I have ever done somthing like this. The motor would only smoke just a bit after running for about 20 mins of cutting the lawn. I ran my finger up the wall and cant feel any type of ridge at the top of the cylinder and the valve seats are shinny all the way around for what that matters. I took the breather off and it was clogged up with muck and I cleaned it out now I hear what sounds like a thing inside that goes up and down when I shack it. Not sure it that is correct or not. I really dont want to go full bore into this motor and screw it up. I dont know right now maybe just take a night off and think about what Im going to do. Either way it will be back in and running before spring.:D One more thing I was able to remove 5 head bolts without a wrench they had been that lose. The others had been just about as bad.

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