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RUMBLEFISH

Then engine

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RUMBLEFISH
Here is what it looked like after I took it apart and wanted to start a new thread to get some help and ideas. I have already orderd a carb and engine gasket set. Well please take a look and give me your ideas. Thanks Before a little cleaning. [IMG]http://i50.tinypic.com/246v3ae.jpg[/IMG] After cleaning. [IMG]http://i47.tinypic.com/n5mx6v.jpg[/IMG] The cylinder wall. [IMG]http://i46.tinypic.com/io42ed.jpg[/IMG] On a side not all the head bolts had been very loose when I pulled the head. When I did the compression test I got 90psi and it would smoke just a little when it ran for about 20 mins of cutting. What should be the next thing I do on this. Thanks for the help.

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RUMBLEFISH
Harbour freight has a hone tool that goes from 2 to 7 inches so is that the one I would want and do I just use a hand drill? Do I also just order the stardard rings for the piston as well? Sorry about the dumb questions but new to this stuff. Thanks

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xenon172
Have the bore measured to see if honing is enough or if it needs to be re-bored before buying rings. Also check valves and valve guides for wear. Also check the crank for dimensions and roundness. Once the engine is apart all moving parts and wear areas should be checked.

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D-17_Dave
The best thing I can say due to your lack of experiance is that your doing fine so far. I'd also recomend you purchase, download, or otherwise obtain a copy of the Briggs repair manual. This is like a Bible of knowlegde on these engines. It covers about everything you will need to return the engine to it's former glory.

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RUMBLEFISH
I am going to print out the manual tonight and put it in a binder. Then I will see what special tools Im going to need to get and attempt to do a good job. Stayed tuned for more questions as time goes by. Thanks guys for all your comments and advice. I needed it.;)

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MikeES
How much ring ridge do you have? By the pictures not too much. The amount of ring ridge will determine the how much wear you have in the bore of the cylinder. If very little you will not need to bore it out. That engine was pretty clean, it looks like the little bit of oil was coming up the valve side of the piston, you may have a broken oil ring...so you may want to put new rings on (always hone the cylinder if you remove the piston).

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RUMBLEFISH
I feel no ridge at all and cant budge the piston in the cylinder at in any position. I wonder if the oil you see is due to the very lose "as in hand tight" head gasket?

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xenon172
quote:
Originally posted by Architectdave
Chase all your threads with a tap to get the rust and crud out of them so you get good torque. That engine looks great!
Also chase the threads on the head bolts.

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HubbardRA
That engine looks very good. New rings and a valve adjustment are probably all that is needed. I would also check the crankcase breather while it is apart. I have done two B/S engines this way and neither of them smoke at all after several years running. No ridge usually means no significant wear. Before I got a hone, I would just use sandpaper on the cylinder to break the glaze so the rings can seat properly. Personally I will not use chrome rings unless those are the only ones I can get. Sometimes chrome rings are very difficult to get seated properly in a stock engine.

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pungo
Without side to side piston slop you are in good shape. New rings. Check the exhaust valve guide side to side play. This one have points?Ditch them and go later Model coil, you won't regret it.

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BLT
I have had very good luck with chrome ring sets. Very little has to be done for their installation. You can read up on it in the repair book you downloaded.

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RUMBLEFISH
Thanks for all the input you have no idea how much I appreciate it. I'm working on getting the flywheel off then go a bit deeper with new rings and check the valves.

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powerking_one
The scuffing/scoring of the cylinder walls is usually due to dirty oil or running with a low oil level. If you feel the groves with your fingernail, a de-glazing hone will probably not clean up the bore. If this is the case, putting in new rings will result in high oil consumption. Try it and see or be prepared for a real overhaul (bore the cylinder to oversize)new piston, rings, etc. Tom(PK)

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HubbardRA
One item I forgot to mention. You may just have a stuck ring. You definitely need to clean the ring grooves before installing new rings. Usually I just break one of the old rings and use the sharp edge to scrape out any carbon deposits in the groove. If the rings cannot move freely as designed, the engine will likely smoke, even with new rings.

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