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KenW

12 V coil Conversion-hot coil?

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KenW
I converted my Simplicity 725 with a 7.25 hp Briggs model 19 to a 12 coil system. I mounted the coil to the top horizontal hood support so it is close to the top of the engine. After running it a bit it gets very hot due to its location. It is about as hot as the fins on the head. Is that amount of heat an issue? Thanks...Ken Williams

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carter
Mine's in the same location. I've never checked it after a long run but I've never had a problem with it. They get plenty hot under the hood of a vehicle. Ron

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ka9bxg
Do you have a resister block in line I know on big tractors that you need it or you will burn up the coil.I put a coil on my 19d and ran good for about 10 minutes then it quit I will try agian with a Dodge resister block.

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SmilinSam
I was always under the impression that the resistor in the line was if you were using a 6 Volt coil in a 12 volt system. that is what the situation was on my previous WD tractor. On my WD45 I just used a 12 volt coil and eliminated the resistor to the coil. I have 12 volt coils on several old briggs engines and they have been running fine. Sam

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SmilinSam
When the mag goes bad on a Briggs it is easier to change it over to a external battery ignition setup like Kohler uses than to take the Briggs out of the tractor and fix it. I find that they start better with Battery Ignition than with the standard Briggs ignition.(the exception being the Briggs magnetron electronic ignition)

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Roy
I think the resistor is to drop the voltage to the points and thereby increase the life of the points. Most cars with resistors (internal or external) have a bypass circuit to put full battery voltage on the coil while starting. My 2 cents worth. Roy

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KenW
The coil has an internal resistor (required for the conversion) Another advantage is it starts easier in the winter. Some car coils have the internal resistor and some do not. I used a Kohler coil and a Kohler 12v condenser as well as a Kohler high tension lead.

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dvogt
if you have a coil with 3-5 ohms of primary resistance a inline resistor is not needed , if you are using a typical chevy coil they have only 1 -1.5 ohms of primary resistance you will need a external resister . if you are unsure of what you have take a ohm meter & measure the resistance across the + & - terminals on the coil with the wires disconected .

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