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OrangeMetalGuy

Transmission housing gasket seal

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OrangeMetalGuy
My #2 machine is still leaking fluid from the transmission gasket, so I took it apart (this time left most of the trans on just pulled the axle, tube, and right side of the tranny off). Should I forgo the gasket entirely and just use Permatex of some sort? Or use a combination of a new gasket and gasket sealer? One of the bolts broke off too and I cannot get this thing out. Tried a screw extractor but that won't budge it. Can't hardly make a dent with a drill on either side of the bolt either. Ugh.

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steve-wis
First, get a good cobalt drill with a 135 deg. point on it, run it slow, and drill out the bolt. After drilling thru with a drill the same size as would be used to drill and tap a hole with the same thread, a tap should clear the remaining bits of bolt. As for sealing, I use a gasket with a light coating of good sealer on each side. DO NOT overtighten! Just snug the bolts and let it set till the light coating of sealer is set up, then snug again but not too tight. Someone might have a torque spec. on these bolts, but I do not. This works for me. The case must be very clean and flat, no dirt or raised parts from disassembling it. There was another post a bit ago that discussed different sealers and techniques for using them, find it, lots of good info. Steve

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OrangeMetalGuy
Thanks Steve. I did find a tiny bit of old gasket under the leaking area, I think that's something I missed and why it leaked. Home Depot or Lowes have a cobalt bit like that?

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mendon-chalmers
That will do it, I used only the paper gasket on mine with no leaks yet, have also put a thin layer of grease on both sides with the gasket in the middle with no leaks also.

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jlasater
Generally speaking, any good sharp bit will do. Center-punch the exact center of the broken piece, and make sure you drill it dead straight. I'd recommend using a small bit (1/8" at most) for the initial hole, then open it up. That way you can control what's going on. As you creep up on the final hole size, you'll start to see thin lines showing which are the threads in the hole. Soaking it with PB Blaster a few times over a day or so helps as well. When I go through this sort of thing, I always make sure to run a tap through all the holes to clean out any rust that may be forming.

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steve-wis
You can find cobalt drills in many places. They have a higher amount of cobalt than standard drills. They are all I buy, they last so much longer. They are a bit more prone to chipping if you are abusing them at all tho. I agree, those bolts shouldn't be hard and a standard drill will cut them, make sure it is sharp. A smaller hole is a good idea, but remember if the first hole is off center they all will be so be very careful to get started on center. If the hole goes all the way thru the housing, drill from the back side where the bolt end is flat. Also if drilling from the back and you have some hole that doesn't have bolt in it, a full size drill will put you on center. You can start with a full size to spot the bolt end, then go to a smaller one if you like. With a sharp drill, it should go easy for you. If you aren't good at sharpening drills, it is worth the money to have someone sharpen them or buy a drill doctor for yourself. Steve

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OrangeMetalGuy
I can access tne back of the hole so should be able to go thru the center. If the threads won't clean up well I will just put a bolt through it and use that.

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LesH
What I did was grind the broken bolt to where it is flat-- the broken off end is flat-- so that the punch will make a nice mark, then use the other half of the gearcase mating hole as a guide-- I reassembled lightly then used a transfer punch to mark the hole--- right on the center. Then started with a 1/8 inch dia. drill bit, then worked up to the correct tap drill size. Slowly but surely...

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jlasater
Sometimes you can get lucky with left-hand drill bits as well. Frequently they will grab and spin what's left of the bolt shank out of the hole when it gets thin enough.

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