Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

Sign in to follow this  
Chris727

Axle tube repair

Recommended Posts

Chris727
I was looking over my old B-12 tonight, planning to finally install a fresh rebuilt BGB, when I noticed a small crack in the axle tube at the differential keyway. I think it will run a while yet, the crack is very fine and about 7/16" long. I do have a crack-free spare on the shelf, though it has some minor grooving where the oil seals rode. I am concerned about seal leakage. I have heard of the speedi-sleeves but since the tube is already removed, I was thinking of having the groove welded up and having it turned smooth. Has anyone else done this? Thanks in advance. -Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jlasater
I'd have a sleeve turned by a machine shop to be a press fit over the outside of the tube. Needs to be out of something reasonably thick, preferably DOM.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OrangeMetalGuy
The sleeve is a good idea. I have one with a heavy-duty muffler clamp on it, it's tight as a drum. But the sleeve is a better idea. I have come to believe that even on a new uncracked tube, a sleeve or some other reinforcement should be put on to prevent any cracking. I wish the keys were softer so they'd give way before the tube cracked too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HubbardRA
I disagree with the above comments about extruded tubing. The DOM tubing is stronger and harder than just ordinary tubing, but it is also more prone to crack. Tubing that is annealed (not hardened) is the best choice for a sleeve, because it will give quite a bit before it will start to fail in any way. I had a hardened driveshaft that kept breaking, until I finally annealed it after re-welding. No problems after that. You have to be careful with hardened materials. DOM materials are strain hardened from the drawing process. Just my opinion, use as you wish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jlasater
DOM is stronger and "tougher" than welded-seam tubing, but I wouldn't call it harder. At any rate, it should be more than adequate to reinforce the axle tubes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris727
I found my spare and looked it over. I now see I had a different problem than I had thought. It doesn't appear worn, rather it is rust pitted, won't that eat the seal? There is what appears to almost be a factory recess, about 1/2" wide, it is shown between the yellow marks. This is on both left hand and right hand sides of the axle. I don't think its wear? I also found that the keyways have some slop in them. I guess I could have 2 new keyways cut but would having a total of 4 keyways weaken the tube too much?






Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jlasater
Yes, that would eat the seal. I'd either start looking for a replacement (new, or off ebay), or talk to a machine shop about possible repairs. They may be able to weld up the area of the seal and turn it back down, but that may also weaken the axle. Alternately, see if there's a way to space the seal slightly so that it doesn't ride on the same spot. I'm not familiar with the setup you have, so can't say if it's possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris727
Yeah, I'll have to show it to a machinist. I have probably eight more parts transmissions but I wouldn't be surprised if they have the same rust problem. Thanks for all of the input!!! -Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OrangeMetalGuy
I'm pretty sure that's a bearing surface, not where the seal rides. A seal wouldn't put a mark anywhere near that wide. I would just polish it up and install it. Worst case, you have to put a seal in every couple of years... not a big deal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jlasater
If it's a double-lip seal, it could do that if moisture got stuck between the two lips. Looks a little polished where the two seal lips might have ridden, and looks like the bearing probably rode to the right of the mark. But I'm just guessing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×