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mike_sdak

what size motor for 917 repower?

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mike_sdak
My old KT-17 series I is ready for a rebuild - it probably burns a quart of 15-40 or 30wt oil in 2 Hrs or so. I am thinking it will need to be bored. I would estimate $700-1000 for the rebuild. I think a repower would be a better option. I have a line on a 16 HP cast iron briggs, with electric start and generator. I don't know if it would fit, but I am determined to find out. It came off an auger, I believe. What are the items to look for? Shaft size? I think the KT-17 is 1-1/8". Bolt pattern on oil pan? Electrical? When I look at it, I'll see if I can find a spec. no. or model no. Thanks in advance,

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RayS
16 hp Briggs will drop right in. Will need a different drive shaft and ignition switch. Kt is battery ignition and 16hp is magneto or magnetron. I have a drive shaft for the Briggs if you decide to go that route.

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BLT
16 HP engine will work. I repowered a DA 917 to a 16HP Briggs engine a few years ago. My engine came from a pressure washer. Oil pan was OK and there were mounting holes in tractor engine bed plate. Kohler engine coupling parts were re - used, but I bought a longer drive shaft from Simplicity. My engine has a gear starter and a dual circuit electrical system. I rewired the light circuit from the engine thru the light switch to the lights. The battery charge circuit was connected to the existing charge wire. I replaced the ammeter with a voltmeter, butt connected the ammeter leads and took the voltmeter sensing voltage off the accessory terminal board which makes the meter key operated. I bought a muffler, elbow and heat shield from E-bay. For the magneto circuit I bought a Bosch relay from a boneyard and connected it power to open mag wire using existing Kohler application ignition switch. Shaft size should be OK as the engine shaft isn't used for anything that I can think of. That's about it.

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mike_sdak
Well, we'll see how it goes. I picked her up for $100. Interesting. It looks like the old 9 HP briggs I rebuilt about 20 years ago. The seller had an identical engine on a b-10, so it looks like it can be done. I will post pics later....

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PhanDad
Mike, Here's some pics of my 17GTH-L (original engine KT17) which I re-powered with a Briggs 16HP with old style starter/generator:






Very happy with it. As others above said, it bolts right in. I also used the rubber coupling from the KT17 installation and different driveshaft. When using the rubber coupling, the driveshaft should have a "nose" that inserts into the rubber coupling. For reference, you should find the KT driveshaft is 17 1/4" outside flange to flange. The 16 HP Briggs driveshaft is 19 1/16" outside flange to flange. Simplicity also used a 2 fiberglass disk setup (no rubber coupling, no "nose" on driveshaft) on early 7116 tractors. I don't know the length of that driveshaft. I replaced the ignition switch to a "Briggs" type and used most of the existing wiring harness where I could. I moved wire connections on the plate that plugs into the back of the ignition switch. I mounted the required voltage regulator under the gas tank. All "custom" wiring for that:


Here's the wiring diagrams I used with some of my notes on it:




I've since replaced the 10HP Nelson "can" muffler with the "stock" 7116 muffler and it's much quieter. Go for the install, you won't be sorry.

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Roy
"I mounted the required voltage regulator under the gas tank. All "custom" wiring for that:" Bill, I'm puzzled. Where/how did you find room beneath the gas tank???? Thanks,

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PhanDad
Brettw, See this post for info on the electric clutch - it's toward the bottom of my post: http://www.simpletractors.com/club2/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=109463 Roy, You can see the voltage regulator mounted on the frame in the pic above. The battery/gas tank support is removed in the pic. I placed the regulator in several places on the frame until I found a spot that it fit, I could wire it up, and it had clearance.

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ardisam
I would try to find another kt motor or find a k series and maybe change the driveshaft, instead changing the motor, wiring, and the driveshaft.

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1969nicholas
I put a 16HP briggs on my 7790 that was wore out. Its the best thing I ever did and has plenty of power.I rewired it and brought a new ignition switch.I watched ebay for drive shaft and all other parts. In my case the diesel was junk and was not worth fixing.I also spent the money and put a brand new muffler on her. I think its pretty much a 7116H now.(I copied the 7116H for parts change over)

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JimDk
Here is my testimonial to the durability of the Briggs 14/16 HP engines. Here are a few pictures of my workhorse B-112 that I bought about 20 years ago. It already had a 14 installed, and I have never touched the engine other than normal service. It does many odd jobs as well as countless hours of tilling and snow plowing. I have worked this tractor like a rented mule and it keeps chugging along. I hope to give it a much needed re-furb soon. Hauling a hugh tree away 3 ft. per load.


Roto tilling fresh plowed sweet corn patch.


Moving a dead B-110 to the shop for repair.


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D-17_Dave
Nothing beats the power of the 16HP single cyl. Briggs in these tractors for normal use. But don't underestimate the smooth power flow of a good model twin cyl. engine. There are many good twin cyl. engines out there now that with solid state ign. and alt. style charging systems that will work in many of these tractors with little to no modification. The high torque output of the older cast iron cyl. single cyl. engines are unmatched, but aren't really needed for mowing and most other normal chores. The cost of updating the ign. or replacing the worn parts doesn't justify the conversion some of the time. Most of the newer engines are use and throw away engines anyway. You make the choice, it's your tractor. Just weigh the options and roll the dice.

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MikeES
Here is something to try first. Rebuild the breather on your KT17. Remove the vent tube from the air cleaner and and vent it to atmosphere, you will want to route it to towards the ground. My KT17 was burning oil, sucking it all into the carb. I remove the vent to the air cleaner, and the tractor does not burn more than a 1/2 quart for the whole summer. Made the same fix on a friends tractor with the same results.

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kenmill1958
I Replaced my KT17 withan M18 Kohler. Used one of Al Edens ignition conversion kits. Eng bolts right in and ignition conversion was a snap.

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MPH
Love your firewood sled Jim^ 16hp briggs is hard to beat for a hard working machine, plus they run a lot cheaper then an Onan. Never have owned a Kohler so don't know about them, except i thought they all came with a chrome handle.;)

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mike_sdak
Hey, thanks for all of the input. I do plan to manipulate the breather, as suggested, before I mess with replacement. I found the model-type-code numbers: 326434 0023-01 7309261 I think this makes it a 16 HP motor, as advertised. Are manuals available for this motor? Also, here are the pics - Does the ignition coil make it battery ignition already??








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mike_sdak
A couple more items: 1. Mike S: remove the breather hose from the bottom of air cleaner, and leave attached at breather cover? I figure I will try this, first. 2. After doing a little digging, the model number appears to be the same as the Briggs used on the 7116, except that this one has a belt-driven starter/generator. I wouldn't think that would cause a problem. 3. The motor has an ignition coil. I assume then, it is modified to battery ignition, more like a Kohler, No? I should then be able to use the Kohler wiring diagram, correct?

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JimDk
Mike, You are correct that you can use the Kohler wiring for the coil. You will need to source a higher mount for the starter generator. You will also need a correct voltage regulator and find a place to mount it. See Bill's post above to guide you on both of those changes. You will also need to follow his wiring diagram to wire the regulator. Jim

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mike_sdak
I just now noticed something - it appears to be wired for postitive ground? When we started it the other day, the red wire was hooked to the + terminal, and it started fine. So if I switched it to negative ground, the starter-generator would turn the wrong way, correct?

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PhanDad
"the starter-generator would turn the wrong way, correct?" A couple of things to look for: I don't see any voltage regulator mounted on the engine, so you might only have a "starter", not a "starter/generator". The starter/generators (S/G) come in both CW and CCW rotation. I bet starters also are available with both rotations. I believe the Briggs setup takes a CW rotation (when viewed from the pulley end) S/G with negative ground. Cub S/G's are opposite. Maybe a CCW starter (or S/G) is mounted on your engine. Hopefully someone on the forum can agree with my remembrance.

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