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Bailey

MIlky Oil?

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Bailey
Bought a 3212v couple of weeks back. Haven't done much with it, but considered plowing some snow. Thought I'd check the oil, not knowing how it had been treated by PO. Removed the fill cap and it immediately started running out milky, tan colored oil. Starts and runs fine, but I've got no idea what the weird oil. Anyone ever see this, or have any ideas otherwise?

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Les
definately water, water and oil do not mix but the additives in the oil act as an emulsifier, allowing mixing to occur. Milky color is the classic indicator of water and/or antifreeze contamination.

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MPH
That's why the first thing I do to any tractor is drain the oil, fill with heating oil, crank it over for a few min with the plug wire off, drain, then add clean oil before I even try to start them Have yet to get a tractor with oil in that I would run it on, normally looks and smells like it been in there a LONG time.

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UCD
Heating oil, diesel fuel or Kerosene acts as a cleaner and also is a lubricant. It will dissolve any sludge and suspend it when it is drained and lube the bearings and cylinder walls when being turned over.

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Les
Heating oil is diesel fuel, same as what you get at the pump exept it has Red Dye and will probably be high in sulfur, that will clean out the sludge very well, just dont run the engine very long.

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Brettw
It has been stated to "not run the engine very long". I would not run the engine at all with heating oil, kerosene or diesel in it. You should, as mentioned above, remove the plug wire and turn it over a few times. Actually running the engine with a combustible in the pan is not safe practice.

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MrSteele
Running the engine at all with a solvent inside will allow you the joy of a rebuild to replace the burnt out bearings. Turn it over with the spark plug disconnected, never actually start the engine.

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ketchk
just because there was water in it don't mean the engine is shot i had a briggs twin that i got in the winter and thought it was seized well it was actually frozen after i thawed it out put in oil ran a few minutes and changed it did this 3 times it still runs 2 years later with no problems

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