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jerseyjoe

Considering a Tiller

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jerseyjoe
Hello All, I've got a line on a Tiller (1690393) which is a 30" rotary tiller, belt driven. (Are they all belt driven?) Just wondering: Is the 30" Big enough? Tough enough? the right size for 200' x 200' garden? The soil has plenty of clay and my tractor will be a 6216. All comments will be appreciated, if it's too small a tiller, let me know... My brother has a troy bilt tiller which I could use... however just thought the Simplicity could do it too. (And be more fun!) Thanks... Spring is coming. Jersey Joe

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Brettw
Darn near an acre. That's a lot to till with a 30" tiller. If it's never been turned, that is going to be a real workout for the 6216. Will it do it? It should. Is it the best option for that much area? In my opinion, no it is not. That, and $.99 will get you a cup of coffee at the local Speedway. Actually, you don't even need my opinion, just the $.99 8)

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jerseyjoe
Hey Gang, Thanks for input... it used to be a well tended garden. My Dad did all that for quite awhile. The past 8 to 10 years it has lay fallow. I plan to bring it back, and in one area forsithia (sp?)bush took over. The bush is gone, however there will be some roots to deal with. Thus some of my wondering about a 30" tiller as being tough enough. The Troy bilt did well in the past... however that was when there was a "garden keeper" on the property (Dad). More when I see this tiller.... Thanks again. Jersey Joe

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Cvans
I believe you need to get it worked up with something larger first. After that your tiller should work fine. My Son is doing the same thing. I broke it up with a sub-soiler last fall and will hit it with the tiller in the spring. A 30 inch tiller is fine, it will just give you more time on the tractor is all. If your like me that is a plus. Good luck, Chris

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B10Dave
:DThirty inch tiller can be used to keep weeds out from between the rows in a garden that size. Good for more seat time through the season and a definate reduction in hand weed removal. Win win situation in my opinion.dOd

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MPH
If it had been kept with a Troybuilt, which is one good tiller, the Simplicity tiller will take over just fine. You may need to till it a couple times this first year over. If you can get ahold of a one bottom plow, use it first, then till smooth. yea, roots are a pain to deal with, but just keep them cut off the tines. My entire place was spruce trees when I bought it and started clearing.

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SmilinSam
A 36 inch tiller for a bigger tractor with a hydro would be much more suitable for clay. The 30" tillers on the stamped frame tractors, as well as all the ones on the 738 types and Yoemans, were almost all run off the pulley attached to the short transmission stub shaft on the left of the tranny. This means you dont have live power. When you push in on the clutch the tiller stops. I got along fine with them in nice loose black dirt, but I never liked them in heavy clay where clods form up. Tractors always seemed to go too fast to do a nice job, and you couldnt ride the clutch like on the bigger ones to slow it down a little.

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sunrunner
6216 + tiller + 1st gear + varia-drive pushed to low + a lot of passes, should do it - I will PM you tonight - Chris plus I need a model# of tractor....

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Burntime
Wow, I would probably be stuborn and try it in a few attempts with my 36 inch. Maybe a half hour here and let it cool. Heck, I wheel barrowed 34 yards plus of crushed stone on my retaining walls when I built them. Slow and steady should do it. If you have a neighbor with a BIG tractor to go thru it first would be easier on your machine. All depends on the machine. Good luck, we are gonna need pics! I am ready to take the snowthrower off of my tractor and mount the tiller and deck on the other!:D

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jerseyjoe
Chris, (and Everyone...) Thanks for all the input and advice. Today was a nice warm day here in Jersey, spent most of the time working on a CJ5 my sone and I are restoring. I'll keep you posted with tiller progress. And Chris I responded back to you. Thanks, Joe in Jersey

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acfarmer
I made a ripper/small subsoiler for my 9020 and rip any area first before tilling with a garden tractor tiller, it makes tilling go much easier plus it breaks the had pan up.Also do basically the same thing with the chisel plow before using the 5' tiller behind the AC 5040 on large pieces of ground.With that large of an area if you could get it chisel plowed and then tilled with a large tiller to start the season you'd be much better off

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MrSteele
If it was worked with a Troy Bilt, remember that it was not worked very deep. I am using the in-law's garden spot. I was told that he worked it at about 6" deep with the Trot Bilt. After attempting to work to that depth with a Merry Tiller with little luck(tiller kept trying to bounce out of the dirt at more than about 3" depth). The Merry will work to 14" or so, depending on how good of shape your back was in before you started. I broke the garden and found that he was working it at 3-4", mostly 3.. In North Alabama, the 'good dirt' is red clay. That was all the depth the Troy Bilt would go anyway, due to the design of the tines and housings. Break your garden, or at the least, run a subsoiler through it, find someone with a chisel plow, perhaps to loosen it deeper, then your tiller should be fine. My garden is about the size of yours, maybe a bit larger, even, and I work it with the Merry...about 26"

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captainweezy
Last year I just drug a set of disc around to loosen up a brand new spot to plant corn. It actually did good tilling but this year I am prepared better. I have a breaking plow and a much better tiller. I am going to be getting a bunch of tractor time as soon as the ground dries up.

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