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Brettw

JB Weld

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Brettw
I have never used it, but hear some pretty amazing things about JB Weld. My question is this: If I use it to sturdy up a "wallered" out keyway on a transmission input shaft, will it hold up? Is it that strong? The pulley is being replaced, so it should hold the key properly. The problem is, the shaft is NLA, and for now this repair would work, short of splitting the case, and having the shaft filled and machined. I can always do that if it is an issue in the future, sort of a "nothing to lose" if I give it a try now. Or is JB not really tough enough for this type of service? Thanks in advance.

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osenga
i would say . mix some up put some in key spot put key in put puley on and let set for 24 hours. I can say this because when I used it was on my ford 9n. And used it on the block it had a small crack from where it froze and the ratior was leaking. I have not had no problems with it yet . Plus i know a few farmers that have used on other things and I know it has held that stuff so i can see no reason it wont hold that in place for you

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BLT
Keep in mind, JB Weld is an epoxy base and not steel. Certain areas I have had success, but pressure areas not, and where things got hot not. I have serious doubts if a formed keyway will hold up. I would try drilling a new spot on the pulley hub and into the shaft a tad and tighten a pointed set screw.

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PhanDad
I have had some luck with epoxy filling in a slightly damaged crankshaft keyway on the front of the Briggs in my Homelite T-12. The keyway was only damaged on one side, the side where the rotating force is applied. I used "A/B Putty", a 2 part epoxy that comes in sticks and you mix together. The stuff is old, acquired from my days in the chemical industry where it was used to repair holes in pipes, etc. I believe JB Weld is a similar material. As suggested above, with the key in place, I filled the damaged keyway area with the epoxy. After drying, I filed the excess flush with the surface of the crankshaft. In my case, the entire damaged area is within the hub of the rotating electric PTO, so there is no where for the hardened putty to go (can't "pop out"). Also, I was able to use a longer key that extends into an area of undamaged keyway. I've had the rotating assembly off one time since the repair was made, the the epoxy was still there.

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bud119195
I would try it. Whats the worst that can happen? I plugged a small pinhole in the bottom of the oil pan on our car 2 years ago and it is still there and looks like the day I put it on...

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RBE17
I would definitely give it a go. I love JB weld and use it for quite a few things. It's my go to epoxy. I read a story where some guys were competing in a Turbo Buick event and they cracked a head in the semifinals. They drilled holes at the ends of the crack, filled the crack w/ JB weld and put a piece of metal over it. They went onto the finals and then two years later it was still there. They never touched it beyond their pit repair.

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Brettw
Thanks all. I may just give it a try, and when I have the time and the parts, replace the shaft with a good one. I will keep everyone informed as to how it goes, it's going to be a bit before I get to it. Where does one find JB Weld? NAPA, Harware store? I have never seen it.

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qtown7116H
quote:
Originally posted by RBE17
I would definitely give it a go. I love JB weld and use it for quite a few things. It's my go to epoxy. I read a story where some guys were competing in a Turbo Buick event and they cracked a head in the semifinals. They drilled holes at the ends of the crack, filled the crack w/ JB weld and put a piece of metal over it. They went onto the finals and then two years later it was still there. They never touched it beyond their pit repair.
Uh oh...a Turbo Buick guy in Coopersburg? Don't see many of them around here anymore...especially minewah

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RBE17
quote:
Originally posted by qtown7116H
quote:
Originally posted by RBE17
I would definitely give it a go. I love JB weld and use it for quite a few things. It's my go to epoxy. I read a story where some guys were competing in a Turbo Buick event and they cracked a head in the semifinals. They drilled holes at the ends of the crack, filled the crack w/ JB weld and put a piece of metal over it. They went onto the finals and then two years later it was still there. They never touched it beyond their pit repair.
Uh oh...a Turbo Buick guy in Coopersburg? Don't see many of them around here anymore...especially minewah
Ex-TB guy. I sold my '86 GN in 2005 along w/ all the parts. I see less T-Types and Turbo T's than I do GNs. There's one that sits outside, but covered on Old Bethlehem Pike leaving Coopersburg headed south. It's on the right hand side. There's also another one right across from the elementary school on Limeport Pike although I haven't seen it recently.

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MrSteele
If you put it together, tighten the pulley while the JB is setting, and don't touch it for a day or so, it might work. Might. What is likely to happen, though, is as soon as you put it in service, the JB will likely shatter. If you have enough room in the pulley arbor, try drilling and tapping, then install a short setscrew tightly, and another on top of the first to be certain that the setscrew does not back out.

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Brettw
quote:
If you have enough room in the pulley arbor, try drilling and tapping, then install a short setscrew tightly, and another on top of the first to be certain that the setscrew does not back out.
quote:
I would try drilling a new spot on the pulley hub and into the shaft a tad and tighten a pointed set screw.
Thought about that early on guys, however, it is a pulley from a vari speed, and the taper does not allow clearance to drill and tap. Thanks though! Now, where to buy this JB stuff............

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BLT
quote:
[i]Originally posted by Brettw Thanks though! Now, where to buy this JB stuff............
True Value Hardware for starts, or try NAPA.

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Gary
Devcon, would probably be a better alternative, as would "Steel Bed". Both of these products are millable when fully cured. I used to be able to get them from Brownell's, a gunsmith supply company. I have also used JB Weld with good results, on less critical applications.

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MrSteele
If you do not want to remove to mill a new keyway, try pinging the shaft with a centerpunch to close the keyway a bit

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ketchk
I have used it for a few repairs that don't require strength it might work for filling a hole but if it comes in contact with force it falls apart i tried it for holding a carb stud in place once i tightened it it came right off

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Ronnie41
I have used jb weld on carbs before, but not on any thing like that, but I have friends that have used it in drag racing, just to finish their races, without problems. They make a couple of diffrent kinds, one is for metal applications, and i think it can be milled after it fully cures, but i have no experience with it.

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Brettw
Thanks all. The input helped me to change the entire thought process and I cut in a new keyway instead of trying any type of epoxy. Fixed solidly and correctly instead of the bandaid. I will try JB weld on something in the future I am sure. Thanks again

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MikeES
Brett, I have used JB weld in a keyway on the axle of one our pulling tractors. I broke the solid axle in a pull, dug out another axle and the keyway was chipped out where the differential mates to it. I clean up the area, used alcohol to remove any oil, put some WD40 on the key and inserted it and filled in the chipped out area with JB weld. Next day the key slid right out, then I filed the JB Weld down to the diameter of the axle. That tractor (Duece) has pulled with that axle in place for over 6 years. I have used JB Weld on mower deck arbor shaft keyways successfully as well.

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