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ac.d17iv

Deck Restoration

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ac.d17iv
I want to start doing a restore on my 42in deck on my AC 712H. My plan is to do a complete tear down, replace what needs replaced, sand blast, POR15 the underneath and paint everything else. This will be my first major restore. Any advice from others would be appreciated. How do I know if my bearings and spindles are bad? Should I just replace them while I have it torn apart? Any other common wear spots to check? Thanks!

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RayS
I would replace the bearings if I were to tear that far down. I have bought several sets of the ones in the link below. Been running a set in one deck for 3 season now with no problems. Usually if a bearing spin real easily there isn`t any or much grease left in them. http://cgi.ebay.com/6-Z9504RST-Lawn-Mower-Ball-Bearings-75x1-7805-Z9504B_W0QQitemZ370284074180QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item5636a694c4

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OrangeMetalGuy
[url]http://www.simpletractors.com/club2/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=106395&SearchTerms=por%2C15[/url] Mine is the pic on the bottom. The POR-15 is great stuff.

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gregnorth
if it ain't broke don't fix it. my allis chalmers 314D is over 38 years old, cuts 3 acres of grass every year and it just keeps on going. mine were greaseless but sounded a little dry 2 years ago so i put grease zerks in them and filled them with grease. i figure they'll let me know when they go. later, greg

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RayS
Do you know the mfg. no. of the deck? there are atleast 3 or 4 different Mfg. Nos. for the 42" and 48" decks. http://www.simplicitymfg.com/manuals/

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a_sannine
no i don't i have to look when u take the bearings out , isn't it suppose to have a number on it so u can buy the same ? the one i want to rebuild is from 919 allis 1980,s can't find number on it as it is been painted before

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RayS
This manual covers the attachments for the 7000 & 7100 series tractors. The bearing number if I remember correctly is a Simplicity part number 108202. The bearing above in the link are the same. Just alot cheaper price wise the SKF or Timken. http://bsintek.basco.com/BriggsDocumentDisplay/default.aspx?filename=jgEDGP_byN1tG_Exj7mRgtLvBCd6

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Willy
If you take the bearing out and turn them with your fingers and they turn smooth I wouldn't worry about using them again. I bought a tool for greasing sealed bearing,it's a needle sharp tube that has a grease fitting on the end it snaps on the end of your grease gun and you can work it under the seal,I use wheel bearing grease with it it stands the heat better. The needle was cheap and bearing are about 14 or 15 buck a pop. Keep it simple (and cheap)

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Storm7012
I'm no expert, If you have a zerk and you grease them even with a sealed bearing when the grease gets hot some would seep in?

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pungo
On the Simplicity deck I'm currently servicing(2010) there was one grease zerk for the center drive,the other two shafts had square head plugs.I just removed them and filled it up with 90 weight. After turning the blades a few times they loosened up and spin free, with no side to side slop. I'm debating doing the whole bead blasting/paint process too on this deck,she is in super shape.I have another Beater deck I might use for the rough stuff. One way or the other,I'm gonna mow with this thing this Spring!

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jerseyjoe
Hello All... Finally good weather coming to the East. Regarding deck rebuilding and doing the spindles... When pressing the bearings off (& new ones on) do you need a press to do this?? I ask since I did it a couple of years back, (spindles needed bearings) and I took it to my local parts dealer. He made like it was a big deal to do this work, and charged me enough. If you guys are doing it at home, is there special equipment needed? Like a big press or something? Of course I'm not going to use a hammer and a screwdriver... Just wondering since I picked up another deck and if it needs work; I may give it a shot. Thanks, Joe in Jersey

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wmgeorge
Joe, I don't know what kind of shop you have, but a typical farm or garage type mechanic should be able. I don't have a press but I have a big heavy vise, a large hammer 2 or 3 lb, and some 1" and 3/4" brass round stock about 10 inches long. A piece of pipe that is cut square on the end to fit the inside race of your new bearing. A bearing puller, that most auto parts stores (Auto Zone) will lend with your credit card for security. If you purchase one, it will cost from $30 to $60 for a good one. Auto Zone has some nice ones, the cheaper ones are junk... For the really tight bearings, a 4 1/2 inch angle grinder with a metal cut off disk, please, please wear your face shield when using. I just cut the outside of the bearing race in two places, set it over a steel anvil (face shield again) and hit with hammer until it breaks, same thing on inside race. To install bearings, the trick is to cool the shaft, like your freezer, and warm the bearing not over 150 degrees. Don't tell my wife, but the warming burner on our new glass top range worked great, I did wrap the new bearing in alum foil first. Wear your gloves and have the pipe and hammer ready to set the bearing after its on the shaft.

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