Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

Sign in to follow this  
LesH

Gas Tank Repair--------------

Recommended Posts

LesH
I bought a 2 gallon oblong looking steel gas tank at an auction. Has a nice chrome cap but on the bottom side there is a tear about 2 inches long in the metal. It is going to need a 3 by 3 piece added. Just wondering how to safely go about it and what I would use to fix it--- Weld?? Epoxy?? Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
anytractorman
Last time I fixed a gas tank I soaked and washed it out with lestoil cleaner and then let it sit in the sun to dry and took a hair dryer and let it blow inside.(make sure the wife is not home) After that I checked it real good for smell of gas and when I was happy I welded a patch in it. **DISCLAIMER** I GIVE THIS ADVICE AS A EXAMPLE OF WHAT I DID YOUR RESULTS MAY VARY,WELDING A GAS TANK CAN CAUSE DEATH IF THE PROPER PRECAUTIONS ARE NOT TAKEN.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HubbardRA
The way I always did it was to fill the tank with water, then put a match or a torch to the inlet area to flash any fuel that is floating on top of the water. Filling it with water will lift any fuel to the top where you should position the inlet, since gasoline floats on water. Always be sure to fill till it runs out the fill neck. Do not leave an open cavity for gasoline fumes to be trapped in. I have done automobile gas tanks this way. Caution: Not taking proper precautions when welding or soldering a gas tank can be very detrimental to your health. I do not take responsibility for any accidents or bodily injury incurred because of using this advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Al
Hi, Be very cautious with this. When I was about 12 years we had an old McCormick Deering 10-20 with steel wheels and spade lugs. The gas tank had a pin hole in the bottom where the water had collected and rusted through. It sat from August until about April. I decided I wanted to use it and decided to fix the 20 gal tank. I took it off and it was powder dry and rust dust came out the fill hole when I shook it upside down. Then I took it to the "livestock" tank and turned on the water filled about half full, shook the water around and dumped. Repeated the wash out. Then filled it with water and tipped it over and dumped the water out. Next I took it to the shop and put it on 2 4x4 wood blocks upside down so the fill hole was off the ground. We had a welder with a 4 1/2 volt tap that you could use a carbon rod to heat metal for resistance soldering. There was no arc, the carbon and the metal would get red hot at the point of contact. I had some acid core solder and was heating around the hole, leaning over the tank. When I broke the contact, the tank blew up and the end facing me was ripped out with about 5 inches of the seam holding the end. This blew me through the air into a fence about 30 feet away. When I woke up my ears were ringing terriby and I was very woozy. I went to the house and my mother heard the blast about 45 minutes earlier, but thought I was out shooting pigeons with the 12 guage and thought no more about it. Had the rest of the end came loose, it would have cut me in half. The inside of the tank was rusty on the bottom, and apparently when I started heating it the fumes came out of the metal pores. I can remember the "flight" like it was yesterday, it was like I was in slow motion and it seemed like I was floating for about 5 seconds, remember being about 5 feet off the ground and after I hit the fence I don't remember anything. I have never forgotten this learning experience and ever since rarely work on gas tanks. I will only weld on them it they are full of water and where I have to weld has a very small area of air and a path for fumes to escape. I would lean more to an adhesive and a metal patch now. Fast learner. Al Eden

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Roy
Best way to solder/heat/weld on a gas tank safely is to purge it with CO2 (dry ice), nitrogen, Co (carbon monoxide), or other inert gas to displace the oxygen thus making an explosion impossible. Have done it many times using dry ice. In the factory we used nitrogen when working on explosive systems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
anytractorman
Roy, That is great info.Sounds like a better way than the lestoil soak that I have done. Al, Sure a eye opening experiance.I would sure think about how I weld a tank now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Storm7012
I take mine to a radiator shop. I've had six or seven done in the last couple years. Where I go is only 25 bucks, in less it's real bad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HubbardRA
Lately, I have just been looking around till I find a plastic tank of about the same size and using that. Unless you are trying to be one hundred percent original, it shouldn't matter. Only one of my tractors has the original tank on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×