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Guy

Sod Buster

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Guy
This thread is a continuation of # 3897 with some specific questions. I made a “one point hitch”, and adapted the Brinly Plow to mount to my 7010 (I retained the “lop-sided” design (see below photos). 1) I have the coulter about 1” lower than the shin. Is that about right..? 2) By using the crank with the plow lowered, I can adjust so the landside is 5” higher than the shin. Should that produce a 5” furrow depth..? 3) On virgin ground, with the above adjustments, the plow pulls itself down to only about 2”. Do I have to make more than one pass, does the plow need additional weight, or should the shin to landside angle be greater..? (The plow weighs about 75 lbs. and I cannot apply down pressure with the 7010 cable lift. I know the B-models had a rod lift that could apply down pressure, but it looks like the plows were attached by a chain to the B-model lifts preventing down pressure) When I was a kid watching movies I guess I should have paid more attention to the “sod busters” than to the sheriffs and gunslingers. [img]http://home.att.net/~herb.niewender/plow-seq.jpg[/img]

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Kent
It's been so long since I tried to adjust a "turning plow" that I don't even trust my memory... a few things come to mind though: 1) Try sanding all the surfaces that cut the soil with a fine sandpaper to remove ALL the rust, and then give them a light coat of oil. The cutting edges should be shiny, just like the ends of tiller tines after use. (The plow point and shear is designed to pull the plow down into the soil, so reducing any additional drag or friction from rust is VERY important.) Then always oil it lightly after use before storing it... 2) Agree with the above post on the position of the coulter in relation to the plow point. The rolling coulter serves two purposes,(a) to slice through the actual grass sod, and (b) keep the plow tracking in a straight line. IMO, the coulter should only cut 3-4" deep, at most... Compare how the Simplicity made plow looks, from the 1962 catalog. The "hub" on the coulter MUST be above ground level when the plow is down in the furrow. 3) These are also very sensitive to adjustments of "pitch" -- at least the old "one horse power" (actually one mule team) ones that I grew up with were. The tip of plow point should be just slightly lower than the flat bottom of the furrow you plow. You have to adjust to where it will be down in the furrow -- not above ground. When sitting above ground, the plow point should be noticeably angled down. Once you've got it to where it will go into the ground, adjust the tip down until it wants to dig too deep, then back off slightly on the adjustment, and see if it tries to "porpoise" on you. It will likely take several attempts to get it adjusted to where it will track true, flat and deep. Once you finally get it set up for your tractor and soil type/conditions, you should seldom (if ever) need to mess with it.... That's about all the "theory" of plowing that I think I remember and I'm not sure how useful or accurate it may be... Hope it is helpful and not "overstating" the obvious. Days spent staring at the north end of a southbound mule are not something I really try to remember![A href='http://www.simpletractors.com/images/700_series_images/700_atch5_lg.jpg'][img src='http://www.simpletractors.com/images/new_in_1962/plow.jpg'][/a]

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dymondclay
Dutch, Someone else with more experience with garden tractor plows may shoot my theories down and help you further but, here is what I see by the photos. The "lop-sided effect could be putting more friction on the "land-side" then can be overcome by the shear sucking in and the weight of the plow pushing down. Decide how deep you want to plow then straighten up the profile to a more perpendicular mounting that ends up level when your wheel is in the forrow. (If you are going to plow 5"deep, put your left rear wheel on a 5" block and check level of plow.) I would also raise the coulter wheel to so the bottom of it is about 3 to 4 inches above plow point. It is only to start the cut of ground and any ground level debris, not to go all the way to bottom of your plow depth. You also may be riding on the bearing shaft of the coulter when the plow is in the ground. I could not see the plow point but, It probably should be pointing down slightly at the end to help the down force. Hope this helps you. Please read email sent to you... Marion W. Kerr

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