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PhanDad

Wheel Weight Mounting

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PhanDad
In this pic of Larry's tractor:


the wheel weights are mounted with the larger side in. I've always mounted them the other way (smaller side in). Is there a correct way? Great looking tractor Larry.

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RickS
I would like my wheel weights to fit inside the rim like shown on Larry's tractor. I have three sets (two plastic covered and one metal) All three actual sit on the lip of the wheel rim and thus increase the width of the tractor. The weight does not extend wider than the rim (to overlap the tire), but does extend outward from the rim. I will say my metal wheel weights must weigh about 50 or 60 pounds a piece. Why I need three sets of wheel weights for two tractors I have not figured out yet. Rick.........

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Brettw
quote:
Why I need three sets of wheel weights for two tractors I have not figured out yet.
Easy. Preparation for tractor #3. Thinking in advance. Pat yourself on the back. Move on. 8D

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dmoore464
They will weigh the same either way is true. However, the effects on the tractor will be different as far as stress on parts and wear on seals or bearings . Moving the weight further out on the rim can cause stress or wear that the parts were not engineered to withstand. If the manual shows how the weight needs to be installed then there is a reason for it. Otherwise they wouldn't have taken the time, trouble and expense of including it. To what extent or damage reversing the weight will have no one but the engineers really know unless someone has experienced it by doing it both ways with new parts and seeing how long they last. The effect could be minimal or it could greatly reduce the life of parts. Having said all that, with numerous aftermarket wheel weights out there, people casting their own out of cement, adding dual wheels or different amounts of weight on the front or back for traction or counterbalance, I'd say the effects seem to be minimal. It's just my background in engineering that has me believing that switching them around does have an effect on it. Dave
quote:
Originally posted by Willy
I believe they will weigh the same ether way.^

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Willy
Most wheel weights fit snugly in the wheel supported mostly by the inside of the rim,I doubt if it would make a bit of difference one way or the other. I've been running 60# weights per side on my Big 10 never any bearing or seal trouble. I guess it's what ever you feel comfortable with.

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PhanDad
Ray, Thanks for the post - now I know the "correct" way. I'll give it a try. In the summer, since I have a hilly property, I run just one set of weights. I especially like these type of factory weights since they're fairly heavy and they have a center hole for the right side axle extension so they sit deep in the wheel. In the winter I add another set (2" steel "homemade") which can be seen in this pic:


Mounting the factory weights "reversed" gives a nice flat surface to mount the "homemade" weights against - and everything except the nuts are "inside' the wheel. Come winter I'll see how things mount with the factory weights mounted correctly.

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CarlH
I have found that there are Bolens weights that work very nicely as 'starter' weights. They fit flush with (or back of) the wheel rims and are close to 50# each. I needed to mount them recently for use with my sickle bar mower for use on hillsides and ditch banks (in addition to calcium chloride solution in the rear tires).

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CarlH
Another reason for wheel weights besides traction is that they lower the center of gravity of the tractor making less it likely to tip over. On my property with hills, banks, etc, I also have front wheel weights mounted on my working tractor.

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HubbardRA
My background in engineering tells me that the weights sit against the face of the wheel either way. As long as the weight sits within the width of the tire, then the entire load of the weight goes through the wheel, through the tire, and to the ground. Since the wheels have a significant offset, causing the weight to sit near the center to slightly to the outside of center, the weight may even remove some of the bending load from the axle. This is, if it matters to you. Doesn't matter to me one way or the other. I don't use wheel weights, I make it hard on my tractor by hanging the weight on the chassis whenever I need it. If it isn't needed, it isn't there.

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