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donmoore1904

7010/3410 Steering wheel sleeve wear

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donmoore1904
I have a 7010 and a 3410, and both have a lot of rotational play in the steering wheel. I finally took a second to look today, and I found that the holes in the split mounting sleeve are quite elongated. This isn't that surprising, as the sleeve is fairly thin. I also found that the bolt, even at the center of the through hole in the shaft, has some play. The hole appears elongated a bit at each side of the shaft. I have to think this is something many people have confronted. The only solution I could think of was to weld a bushing outside the existing one, of thicker material. However, the sleeve is split, which seems to indicate a friction fit was intended. Maybe this is why it is as thin as it is. Maybe reinforcing only at each hole in the sleeve is the ideal solution. In looking at this situation, I have to admit I question the design. I wouldn't expect the steering wheel to be a "wear item." Any ideas, suggestions? Thanks, Don

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donmoore1904
quote:
Originally posted by rsnik
This is a common problem. You could post a "wanted" in the classified. A member may have a parts tractor with a less worn sleeve.
Well that stinks. People buying new steering wheels because the sleeves wear out. Huh. I am currently thinking of getting my inherited metal lathe up and running, and enlarging an extra BGB output steel bushing I have here, slipping it over, and welding. The lathe assembly will take 3 hours, but it has been sitting there for 3 years now...

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sammiefish
Im not envisioning exactly your problem but im sure if you are good welding you could add material and re-shape re-form egged out holes... make up some custom bushings or replace old ones... or even come up with raw material and make a new tube... sometimes the used part is just less trouble ...

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donmoore1904
quote:
Originally posted by sammiefish
Im not envisioning exactly your problem
I'll try again. On my tractors, there is a sleeve about 4 inches long that is molded into the steering wheel, to mount it on the shaft. It has a split in it, by design, where it slips over the shaft. The wheel is mounted to the shaft with a 1/4" bolt. If you envision the split at 6 o'clock, there are holes at 9 and 3 o'clock for the bolt, and they are elongated by the wear of turning the wheel. The sleeve material is maybe 1/8" thick. The hole in the shaft is deformed itself from the same rotational movements of the wheel. Without power steering there is a quite a bit of force on this bolt, the sleeve and the shaft. If you grasp the wheel, it will deflect radially in any direction a bit due to overall looseness between the sleeve and shaft, but mostly rotationally due to the deformed holes in the sleeve and shaft. I had it on my 7010, and assumed the original owner modified it. Now I see the 3410 is identical. I am not sure what they could have come up with - perhaps they deemed the material necessary for a keyed approach was overkill. 35 years down the road maybe I shouldn't be questioning it.

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MikeES
All that I have done when I purchase a tractor with the steering hub loose is usually install a new cap screw (bolt) and tighten down with a locking nut. Once I had to drill out and install a larger bolt than the std 5/16". (it was a metric size) This always solves the problem forever. Many people have used the bolt as a pin and did not have it torqued down...the bolt clamps the sleeve/hub to the steering post.

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donmoore1904
quote:
Originally posted by MikeES
All that I have done when I purchase a tractor with the steering hub loose is usually install a new cap screw (bolt) and tighten down with a locking nut. Once I had to drill out and install a larger bolt than the std 5/16". (it was a metric size) This always solves the problem forever. Many people have used the bolt as a pin and did not have it torqued down...the bolt clamps the sleeve/hub to the steering post.
Mike - you are all over it. I just was walking my dog, and troubling over bushings, welding etc. Then is occured to me. A larger bolt and drilling it out - Eureka. No welding, no spending 1-2 hours. No setting up the lathe. The metric size is a great solution, to avoid going all the way to 3/8". Also, I have to admit, I didn't think of tightening the nut all the way - duh! It was the rotation that really bothered me, but your suggestions give me confidence that with little work it will be good for longer than it needs to be :D. Thank you!

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HubbardRA
Mike is correct. The bolt is meant to squeeze the bushing onto the shaft. The bolt is not meant to be a shear pin. I had one that was wobbled out too bad to drill it oversize. I put a new bolt in with washers and a locknut and torqued it as tight as I dared. I then put two tack welds, one on each side of the sleeve to help prevent turning also. When I later had to remove the sheering wheel, I just hit the tack welds with my 4 1/2 inch grinder and removed the bolt. Steering wheel came right off and I ground the welds down smooth again. More than one way to fix a problem.

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rsnik
Don, I was in a hurry and misread your post. There is a bushing on the steering shaft that often gets wallowed out. The steering wheel gets sloppy on the steering shaft. Other common problems include the holes in the sleeve egging out or the sleeve-to-wheel bond failing. I had this sleeve-to-wheel failure happen while driving my 7013S on steep terrain. You turn the wheel and nothing happens because the sleeve is slipping. I have a lot of steep and a lot of drop off embankments on my property and this could have ended badly. Fortunately it did not. I ended up bidding on every steering wheel on evilbay for a while until I collected some good, solid, spares. I favor the older ones with the clear plastic center with the red "S" in the center. You will find that you have to buy several or many to find a few good ones.

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powermax_paul
I agree, On my powermax tractors I just put in a grade 5 or 8 bolt, nut and lockwasher and torqued them tight. (However, on the powermax, sometimes the steering gearbox mounting bolts come loose too and need tightening to tighten the steering.)

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donmoore1904
So, after reading all the replies, I am sensing that the egging out of the holes isn't necessarily an indication I have to go oversize. I am gathering that tightening the bolt is more than half the battle. Interesting, and it was pretty short-sighted of me to not think more about why the sleeve is slotted. To the reply that the "red S and plastic center" wheel may be one to look for, I got one of those on my 3410. The 7010 is my runner, so the red S is being swapped in. The 7010 has a boring black center. I appreciated all the ideas and thoughts.

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larry8200
I drilled out the hole in the steering wheel to 3/8, and cut a second slit across from the first with a sawzall to allow it to compress a little more. Works great now.

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donmoore1904
quote:
Originally posted by larry8200
I drilled out the hole in the steering wheel to 3/8, and cut a second slit across from the first with a sawzall to allow it to compress a little more. Works great now.
Just when I thought I had the answer, another pops up. Good idea Larry. I was a bit skeptical of the effectiveness of the one slot - the fit is a bit sloppy IMO to expect it to pull tight. I think I'll go your route. If the tractor lasts another 35 years, someone else will be riding it because I won't be.

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donmoore1904
Murphy strikes again. I cut the slit in the sleeve, drilled the holes out to what turns out to be an M9. Hardware store doesn't carry an M9. Went to 3/8, slid the new wheel on, and tightened her down. The sleeve pulled up solid. Well, turns out the sleeve on the new wheel is slighly loose in the plastic. So the wheel moves up and down slightly, and left to right slightly. :|| It is a *lot* less movement than before, and I guess I'll see how long this lasts. I have the original wheel, with no pretty red S in the center. Thanks again for the great advice. Don

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donmoore1904
I am wondering about drilling in radially, maybe in two places. Then drill the plastic a bit larger, to accomodate a sleeve (like a spacer) that tighly fits on a screw/bolt. Then tap the sleeve wall. The only thing I am not sure of is if the plastic would drill cleanly.

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