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sammiefish

kids and safety

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sammiefish
As a purist and a father I have the pto and safety switches installed and working on all my workers. I am concerned, however, about things im not thinking of. stock is stock but im not up with what is current. anything I can do or be aware of that i might not be thinking of?? Also, looking for a safety chute/s for my RHD decks. what is a good age to start our youngsters on these oldsters?

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captainweezy
Well I think the age depends on how well they listen to you and understand how they operate. I just let my 3 and a half year old drive next to me side by side on my 917's today for the first time. He loves it and with the tiller on the back of the one he was driving, it steers very easily. I was close enough to him that I could reach over quickly and pull it back to neutral. Having 2 running tractors really is nice.

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timflury
When they can stand on the brake pedal for all it's worth, they're ready. That can be at a younger age of course if it is on a small frame tractor. I remember when I was twelve I could just get the parking brake hooked over the running board on my dad's 4111.

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dentwizz
I was not allowed to drive one solo until I was 13 even though I had been push-mowing since 11. My parents and grandparents wanted me to have a thorough understanding of the physics behind a 400 pound machine before being allowed to drive it near objects. I think PTO and Seat switches are a very good thing esp when less skilled or practiced operators are involved, but the reverse-cutouts are a distraction to detract from an already complex environment. The chute-guard is a good idea even if it is upwardly deflected 45 degrees(for improved distribution of clippings). I will say though, that the deflector on a young-operator's machine should preferably be plastic as it will likely get bumped into along trees and such.

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sammiefish
thanks guys.. as im sure you know.. the 3/4's are all large frame. and it is all about the maturity of the operator... id be allowing them (if it happens) to use a shuttle or hydro.... they wont use the manual til they can do the brake clutch with patience...(yeah right!!) and of course these are over 800 lbs ...so the physics is worth thinking thru..... I cant remember the age i was allowed to mow with the 310 and there is no-one left to ask... but 13 seems about good... I let my 9/10 year old drive but not mow... the 7/8 year old is just mature enough to get on and drive 5-6acres is too much to walk next to them!!

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MikeES
My son was driving the HB212 at 3-1/2. But he rode in my lap since 2. He was driving in my lap at 3. I explained everything to him. I have always believed it is better to teach and show the hazards than depend on safeties. He was tractor pulling at 7 and he worked the clutch (with extension) throttle and gear shift himself. I see many kids pulling tractors at 14 and Dad is still working the clutch for them, which I feel is unsafe, the child needs to know how to stop the tractor. But keep in mind not all kids are natural gear heads, my son is. So the age is not as important as the skill level.

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acfarmer
The Summer after I turned 7 years old I was turned loose mowing hay with an Allis Chalmers CA and AC Twin Wheel Drive sickle bar mower.Hard to believe it was 51 years ago.

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MrSteele
I started on a John Deere when I was able to crank it with an Armstrong starter(hand crank). My Dad told me I could start pushing the mower when I was able to start it. I was around 7 when I started pushing, didn't have a riding mower until I was married

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Burntime
I was cutting with a 20hp roper at 5. Of course my dad taught me to swim by throwing me in the pool. He had a DIFFERENT way of teaching. I definitely will be teaching my kids differntly. One cool think is I shot a 44 mag at about 7. That gave me the utmost respect for a gun. Warning, DO NOT try this at home!:D

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HubbardRA
Teach the children, then you won't have to worry about safety features. My kids grew up in my garage from the time they could crawl around. There is junk that they could get hurt on everywhere, but they were taught what they could play with and what to leave alone. Now they are 30, 28, and 21. None of them ever got hurt in the garage or working on a machine. They were taught that tractors were not playthings, and never try to start one without my permission, and one very important thing: "Never take a friend in the garage or near a tractor unless I was there." I also taught my kids that they were responsible for anything and everything their friends did when they came to our house. That makes a big difference in who they bring home and what they do while they are here. This still works. My oldest son and one of his buddies pulled up in front of my house not too long ago. As they were walking to the door my son grabbed the other guys ball cap, pulled it off, and said "put the bill in front, Dad don't like people who wear them backward". He also came over one day and his wife stopped by later. When she pulled in the driveway her stereo was blasting and the bass was thumping really loud. He ran to the car and told her shut the music off, and next time shut it off before she pulled into the street, or "Dad will tell you to go home and not come back till you have respect for others who live here." You think kids are ignoring you when you are trying to teach them safety and manners, but it makes you feel good when you find out it really sank in.

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country
We didn't have a riding mower, but between ages 6-8 I was push mowing, driving our Case VAC, and driving our full size truck and old Cherokee up and down the 1/4 mile driveway. I grew up where our Dad taught us younger, but also needed us to learn at that age to help out. I now live (kinda voluntary stuck) in the city, and don't have a tractor for my son to drive, or a long driveway to teach them how to drive the vehicles yet. He is starting 4th grade in a week, and he's driving my 917 fine. I've had him learning to mow with a little sears we've been borrowing while I finish my engine swap. I think it's a good little mower to learn on because it has more safety features and is much easier to drive and handle than the 917.

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Homesteader
im almost 16 now and i've been mowing the lawn on a rider since i was 7. and i've been running farm equipment since my 8th birthday. gradually getting to drive bigger tractors and machinery. my dad is the kind of person who tells you how to do something and what can go wrong. then he gives you the reins and lets you do it. and ive never gotten hurt on a piece of equipment or mower.

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tubatom04
hey i have a 1970's 3212v tractor (about 800lbs) and ive had my 6 year old step sister and my girlfriend 3 year old daughter ride on it solo. But i am right beside them on the brake pedal side and the tractor in 1st or 2nd gear just crawling along, it can be a long walk sometimes but its all worth it when you see them :D its good to see them interested in this hobby at a young age. the best one they both like, and i say is theres is my 525 its small enough that it cant hurt anything but still only run in 1st or 2nd and idled down. thats just my imput.

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