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AC_HB-112

7112 steers hard

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AC_HB-112
Ok, So I know this wa aproblem for the 7100 series but has anyone come up with a solution to the problem? We've replaced all of the bushings we could find, greased the he** out of it, and put tubes in the fronts. is there anything else?

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goodtimo
we had that same problem on our 7116 that we bought new in 1981. Turns out that one of the spindles was bent incorrectly from the factory leading to part of the hard steering problem. We replaced the bent spindle, and recently put those thrust bearings on each side and it seemed to help tremendously. However, those thrust bearings will not last very long, especially if you have a blade on the front or a very rough yard. I'd recommend ordering several sets of them. In my opinion. the rounded edge tires (I think they were Goodyears) on the early tractors (like the 2012 and a few later ones) seemed to steer better than the flatter Carlisle's that the 7100 series originally came with. For example, these steered easier: http://www.simpletractors.com/simplicity/1967_2012.htm Good luck!

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Al
Hi, The most common problem comes from grass and moisture causing the collar on the steering shaft to rust and bind. This is the collar on the top side of the plate that controls the engagement of the gear with the steering quadrant. The steering wheel shaft goes through a sleeve into the steering gear casting. this sleeve contacts an adjustment plate with cap screws on each side. Above this plate is a 3/4 inch collar. As the 2 adjusting screws are screwed they push the sleeve and bevel gear further down into the quadrant. The grass juice causes the collar to rust and bind on the plate. This causes the collar to bind on the plate. Usually a quick fix is to squirt some oil on the steering shaft behind the fuel tank and let it run down the shaft to the collar, turning the wheel back and forth during the process. This usually helps. Removing the steering gear and cleaning the sleeve out and greasing everything really fixes it. 2: I agree the 4.80x8 tires on the older tractors, steer much easier than the 16x6.50x8s. I really noticed the difference when I bought a new 3212 in 1970 to go along with the 10hp landlord. Night and day difference in turning them when mowing Al Eden

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