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MowerMechanic

Simplicity names

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MowerMechanic
Simplicity in the 60's & 70's seemed to name their machines after medieval social classes. Using lower classes for smaller machines and so on. SERF- Serfdom is the socio-economic status of unfree peasants under feudalism, and specifically relates to Manorialism. It was a condition of bondage or modified slavery which developed primarily during the High Middle Ages in Europe. Serfdom was the enforced labour of serfs on the fields of landowners, in return for protection and the right to work on their leased fields. YEOMAN- Yeoman could refer to a free man holding a small landed estate, a minor landowner, a small prosperous farmer (especially from the Elizabethan era to the 17th century), a deputy, assistant, journeyman, or a loyal or faithful servant. Work "performed or rendered in a loyal, valiant, useful, or workmanlike manner", especially work requiring a great deal of effort or labor, such as would be done by a yeoman farmer, came to be described as yeoman's work.[1] Thus yeomen became associated with hard toil. LANDLORD- Landlording may be traced back to the Roman Empire and the manorial system (seignorialism), which began under it — peasants were bound to the land and dependent on their landlords for protection and justice. Under the feudalism such relations became widespread. SOVEREIGN- Sovereignty is the quality of having supreme, independent authority over a territory.[1][2] It can be found in a power to rule and make law that rests on a political fact for which no purely legal explanation can be provided. But where does the Broadmoor come from? I cannot find any reference to the name Broadmoor tied with a social class. Time for the old guys that do alot of crosswords to teach us some history

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Brettw
Broadmoor: Broad: less than classy reference to the female of the species. Moor (more) More is better (see: Tiger woods) This was of the Henry the 8th or the King of Siam type class. Can refer to extra wives (WHAT are you thinking, are ye daft man?!!), wenches, barmaids, harlots, and other multiple female relationships. This trumps all other classes in that it requires vast, vast, and at times incalculable sums of money to maintain (again, see: Tiger Woods). This socioeconomic class is not in the History books, as the outcome was mostly too ugly to contemplate. Hence the lack of any reference to the Broadmoor. Hope that helps. :o)

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MowerMechanic
wow, and what does this for simplicity nameing a tractor after it? Does it have something to do with it being so close to the yeoman that it is excess to have both? like an extra girlfriend or wife? What was simplicity implying by giveing it this name?

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HubbardRA
They also had a model called a Baron. Baron, Landlord, and Sovereign were all names for the large frame tractors, basically the same tractor, just differently equipped.

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dentwizz
I preferred to think the Broadmoor was referring to the term for a sturdy dependable draft animal. As such it fits somewhere into the context, albeit in a different way. I have often debated that entire topic in my head too:p

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skunkhome
Simplicity really muddied the waters with all those names. It still seems to be a point of confusion for a few. The German in me just says, "give me a number!" AC also caught that fever for a short period of time with their Homesteader series. Thankfully they took two aspirins and got over it in the early seventies.

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MowerMechanic
quote:
Don't you guys have any tractors to fix??????
No, they are all running very nicely thank you. But still the question is not answered. If the name of the broadmoor means **imagination time** then why did simplicity choose this name? If it had some other meaning to them than what was it?

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HubbardRA
Moor - a tract of open, rolling wasteland, usually covered with heather and often marshy or peaty. Modify the word with broad and it makes sense. Broadmoor - a wide tract of open wasteland. This could also be from Medieval times meaning the kind of terrain that a Broadmoor could cut.:D

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wilf
broadmoor is the mane of a high security lunitic asylum in england!!! Also there are several golf courses around the world named broadmoor. Broadmoor field in england was he seen of a major battle in oldtime england Wilf

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TomSchmit
Whatever the name means, I believe that the Broadmoor was the best-selling tractor Simplicity ever made ... Over the years, I have seen many more Broadmoors cutting grass in suburbia than large frame tractors. Were any production numbers ever released?

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Les
I think that I will have "Esquire" decals made for my tractor.. Wait, they already used that with Montgomery Wards tractors! Do you think that the Simplicity people named the Wards tractors too?

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