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Al

Melted coil

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Al
Hi, I must be going nuts. I was sure I saw a post with a 19 series coil that was melted. Now I can't find it. Anyway when you have a magneto engine coil that is melted like that, It HAS been fed a dose of 12 volts. Usually by a failed ignition switch, or someone trying a different switch or try and try wiring. The Indak 5 terminal switches are made in a number of different configurations plus magneto and battery ign. versions. The Patent # on the back has no meaning. Briggs has a service bulletin out that says to put a test light or meter on the kill wire and switch the key from off to start 25 times and watch for any indication of voltage, before hooking up a new magnetron if one has failed. Switches often have a grease of lube in them and after being operated many many times, often little flakes get in the grease and may create an intermittent path from the 12 v terminal to the Mag or kill terminal. A pulse of 1 millisecond or 1/1000 of a second is enough to destroy an electronic ign. module. To melt a points coil needs 12 volts for a longer time. We sell a number of ignition modules to people that have gone to an auto parts store and got a switch with 5 terminals. Plugged it in and no spark. The switch is pinned out wrong and has destroyed the modue. Note that if you compare an Indak switch for a magneto (ground to kill) and one for 12 volt (12v to run) the threads on the mounting nut are different. One is fine and one coarser. Before trying any new switch make sure the mounting nut threads are the same as your old switch plus compare the back where the terminals are rived on. The lugs MUST be exactly the same or you may have an expensive learning experience quickly. Al Eden

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dentwizz
Good to know on the threads. I knew they had two types but never had taken the time to notice the purpose(since I only have bought replacement nuts not switches thus far).

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HubbardRA
Rewired a tractor for johnmonkey. Before I went to his home, I took the ignition switch that I was going to use and with a meter, I checked each terminal so that I knew what each of them was. I drew a diagram of the switch and which wires needed to go to the pins on the mating connector. When I checked his wiring harness, the wires on the mating connector did not match what was needed on the ignition switch. I changed three of the terminals to new holes. The other two did not match anything on this engine setup, so I had to cut the wires and splice them in elsewhere. We got it running for a few seconds while I was there, but the gas tank was not hooked up, and there was no battery in the tractor. John hooked those up later, and everything worked. I sure was glad of that. This is the tractor with the two stack mufflers. My point is that to do the job right and not mess anything up, it is best to check everything out before hooking it up and turning on the switch.

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