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Johns

Paint protection

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dmcluckie
Take a part with the color(s) you want to an auto paint store (check phone book), and they can computer match the color with auto refinish paint. I found BASF's Diamont, Glasurit, and Limco lines work excellent as they are urethane grades that take all the abuse you can give them. I like the Diamont best, but Limco is less expensive and just about the same quality. They can also use thier ColorMax system to match your colors if you don't want to trust computers and want to see an actual color. Also check your local NAPA, PPG, and S-W paint stores for some other brands. How good is the match for your decals? VanEvener

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jlasater
An epoxy or catalysed paint will hold up a lot better than enamel will. If you paint the parts yourself, get a respirator, or better yet, a fresh air supplied mask. The catalyser in modern paint is carcinogenic! Not something to mess with.[A href='http://www.wheatfarm.com']http://www.wheatfarm.com[/a]

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JDSnyder
It sounds like you have already painted your tractor, so repainting it with one of the urethanes or catalyzed paints may involve removing what you have put on, a real pain. I would let the paint you have put on cure for at least 60 days. Maybe even park it in the hot sun for a few days to help. You might then check with your auto parts store to see if they have a clear coat that won't wrinkle the enamel. That would be a real mess. Let the paint cure for a while even if all your going to do is wax it. Curing plain enamel will not make it as durable as the new paints mentioned. Like mentioned above, if you use any paints or clear coats with isocyanate catalytics in it, use an air supply mask. That stuff is deadly.

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SmilinSam
A primer should provide a mechanical bond to the subsurface. The finish coat(s) should provide a chemical bond to the primer. Did you use a primer that was compatible to the finish coat..? Enamel usually requires a mist coat and then a full wet coat. Why did you apply 5 coats..? That may be the problem. The solvents in the first coat(s) may not be able to evaporate.

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Johns
I ordered and recieved the decals from Bob Winter, and they look terrific. But, after sanding, priming, and adding about 5-coats of TruValue enamel to the hood and fenders, it doesn't seem like it'll take too much to get the paint to scratch. After all that time and expense, I'd like to have the paint job last at least a few years. Anyone know of a clear-coat or some kind of protection that'll prevent the paint from scratching and chipping so easily. How about some kind of paste wax???? This is a heavy-duty machine that does some heavy-duty work, so I don't want to spend more time obsessing over its appearance rather than using it. Oh, yeah, it's a Simplicity 7117 that'll look real nice with its new paint job.

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jlasater
Check out http://www.autorestorer.com/q_boards/body/index.cgi It's a messageboard all about paint and bodywork. Some of those guys really know there stuff.[A href='http://www.wheatfarm.com']http://www.wheatfarm.com[/a]

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Kent
You may be able to get a clear coat of the same brand/formula of spray enamel paint that you used. I know some enamel spray paint lines have a clear that you can spray as a top coat. I intend to try that on my Big Ten that I'm putting together -- at least on the frame while it's apart down to that level. I don't have the time/money/energy to do a "show quality" restoration, but at the same time I want to make the time and effort that I have spent last as long as possible...

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Johns
The reason that I have 5+ coats sprayed on is that the instructions said it was better to add several thin coats rather than fewer heavy coats, so that's what I did. I also applied the recommended primer after sanding down to bare metal (approx. 2/3's of the sheet metal)...I let dry more time than recommended before applying a next coat (sometimes a couple days). Actually, I would not mind sanding down to the bare metal again because I can get 220 grit sand paper to take down to the primer almost instantly, so sanding should be pretty easy. I will check into some of the brands and outlets provided in this forum over the next couple days...my main concern was/is how to apply them; looks like I may need a spray gun. Thanks for the replies.

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