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sovereign72

Briggs 320000 series engine block, Pic added

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sovereign72
How many threads are originally on the exhaust port? the reason I ask is mine has only two with some pitting. If the rest have burnt out I'd be hesitant to have this lbock cleaned and bored for a rebuild.




The previous owner didnt screw in the pipe all the way and it burnt out the exposed interior threads. There might be enough metal left in there to send a tap in alittle deeper and get another thread or two.

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D-17_Dave
I don't know the tread count but they go in a good inch plus. If you can't see the threads I'd say they are likely covered in soot/rust/gunk. I'd clean them out and chase them before condemning the block. For the lack of an expensive thread chase tool, I use a pipe plug and take a side grinder and cut a few lateral grooves with the sharp edge facing the direction of a cutter. This is cheap and won't last long but does a very good job when cleaning out crud.

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sovereign72
theres no carbon build up in there just a lack of threads. I have the proper tap but they dont do any good without metal. I was pretty sure they should go in a ways but it was easier to ask than tear the muffler off another motor.

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steve-wis
not sure what your engine looks like, but I have a 6 hp on a yeoman that had the threads stripped out for the muffler as well. Mine had the two small tapped holes on either side of the pipe thread hole, so I made a 1/2 inch thick steel plate with the pipe threads in the center and two holes for bolts to match the tapped holes in the block. Screwed the plate on with a gasket, then screwed the muffler in. Works great, been going for a couple of years. The steel will last forever, unlike the aluminum which will sometimes tear out as you remove the muffler. Steve

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steve-wis
I am thinking the only fixes are to either 1: tap deeper, get as much thread as you can, and then if need be have a hardware store thread you a pc. of pipe and leave the threads bigger so it will tighten in the hole,,, or 2: machine an adaptor that can be welded or brazed into the hole and then have new threads in the other end of the adaptor. Can't tell if I am looking at cast iron or aluminum, but if cast, you could have it built up with braze and then re machined with new threads. Also possible with aluminum, but unless you get a good weld job it may not last very long. Steve

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RayS
quote:
Originally posted by sovereign72
there is enough metal to go up to one inch npt and bush back down to 3/4. I have everything to do it with i just dont like rigs. I found another block for $40
If it is a 14hp, 15hp or 16hp it should be a one inch exhaust. I have owned a bunch of the horizontal shaft cast iron Briggs and they were all one inch. Not saying they never made a 3/4" but I would think the parts manual would list two different blocks.

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jdwilson
Hi. I put up with my 2012, for many years, with the exhaust pipe only holding by one thread. It would fall off several times a season. I finally was able to borrow a one inch pipe tap from work and chased out the threads. I then bought a new six inch pipe, put anti seize on the threads, and installed. Good and tight.

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sovereign72
Thanks everyone for the input. This block needs boredd and honed to be used and with a weak exhaust port like that Im not gonna spend the money on machine work for this block. I just bought a new block.

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D-17_Dave
One other possibility to salvage this block is to clean it and chase what is there. When you install a replacement muffler cut the first couple of threads off and try threading it in till tight. Pipe threads get bigger in diam. as they go up the thread count. Cut enough off the replacement till it will tighten with the threads that are left. This will work fine with a light muffler. A lot of weight hanging out into space will fail with good threads.

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sovereign72
Dave, I tapped it yesterday for fun and it didnt make a difference the tap bottoms out in the block before it can do any work. If anybody wants this block after I tear it apart let me know. It will need bored at least .010 if not more. my micrometer is not the best but i showed .oo7 oversize and lots of taper and wave in the cylinder. As far as im concerend its a paperweight.

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dhardin
My tractor bub Bob picked up a nice 12hp L head(from the dump)with a most unusual exhaust port repair. The threads was striped but there is 2 bolt holes on each side for a different style muffler (made for a bolt on muffler) but this previous owner took a 1" pipe floor flange, cut off with a ban saw all the outer parts of the floor flange that would be in the way. leaving the area over the 2 bolt holes and drilled them out to match the bolt pattern. was slick looking. We fired it up and it works just fine. Don't know why people throw working motors away.

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