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mroman59

play in steering shaft 7117H, what can i do

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mroman59
Well I took out my gas tank from my tractor and looked to see if it had a screen in it, like you guys were talking about in another forum. Sure enough it was there and starting to look bad. Thanks for the tip. While I had the the tank and battery out, I noticed some play in my steering shaft. I don't know how much should be there but it seems a little much from side to side or forward and back directions. The gears look in good shape, but I did not disassemble it any further at this time. If the gears are in good shape, what is the culprit? From the parts diagrams I notice some bushing and needle bearing. Also, from the parts diagram it states not to put any grease on the tooth surface of the gear. Does anyone know why? Any help is appreciated. While I have it apart, I might as well try to fix it. Mike

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PeppyDan
I 'll start by answering your question about not putting grease on the gears. Grease would attract dirt, dust, and any other number of foreign debris and would act like sandpaper on the teeth of the gears. Now for the play in the shaft, is the movement at the bottom or at the top of the shaft and approximately how much play? Dan

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Cvans
If you feel the need to lubricate your steering gears, use spray graphite. Excellent lubricant and will not attract dust and dirt. Sticks like stink to whatever you spray it on . Good stuff:D

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mroman59
I assumed that the grease on the gears would attract dirt and cause premature wear. As far as the shaft movement, I hold the shaft at the top, where the steering wheel would mount and move it about 1/8" in either direction at the top. As I do this, I notice the pinion, bevel (#2170988) moving around at the bottom, since it is connected to the steering shaft. There is no movement in the gear, bevel that I notice, but I will check again today. I see there is a bushing in the steering housing, but I don't know if that could be the only cause.

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mroman59
I guess I could just take it all apart and take it into simplicity dealer to inspect and replace any worn parts that he would think is the problem. I have the 7100 series later model, so the removal of shaft and assembly looks a lot easier than the early models.

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mroman59
I took off the steering shaft today. It appears to be worn at the top where the steering wheel sets plus the shaft is worn where the bushing is at the bottom, but more at the steering wheel end. I would guess that I at least need a new shaft and the bushing. The pinion gear looks good to me but I would need second opinion from Simplicity mechanic or someone on this forum. There is very little play on the pinion gear and it tightens up with the retainer clip on the end. A new woodruff key would probably help also. The bevel gear looks good also. I dont know how much the steering housing assembly wears where the bushing slides through. I will need to slide it back on the steering assembly to see. MR

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