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broken off mufler in exhaust port of motor

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My B-210 has the remains of a broken off muffler in the exhaust port. You can just about see the threads in the port but there is still some muffler pipe. The motor is a 10 hp Briggs with the cast iron block. I was considering buying a large easy out and using it after I run the motor to heat things up ? I tried a pipe tap but it got me no where. I am open for ideas and or suggestions, I am sure I am not the first person with this situation. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Al

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SmilinSam
I usually use a real small chisel and if you can start by catching an edge on the remains of the pipe, you can start folding the metal to the inside of the hole. Eventually you can get it folded up in one place enough to cut straight across and once cut you can finish folding it in towards itself and pull it out with a pair of small pliers. I have done this three times now and it seems to work. I don't get hasty but sit down and take my time trying not to cut into the threads on the block. My method- no gaurentees SmilinSam

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bobjack
Hi Al, Sounds Painful. I have never fought that battle, but there are such things as internal pipe wrenches. I've never used one, but I have seen them in catalogs such as McMaster-Carr, if I remember right. You might find it at a big tool rental. It operates on a cam principle to lock a serrated sector into the id of a pipe. Good Luck, bobjack

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schaefer72
hi this same thing happened to mine and there are several posts about it - just search - i ended up using a small file on its edge to made a cut it the pipe just shy of touching the threads then did the same thing all around - then used a hammer and small chisel to get it out - worked great - just take your time and be carefull not to cut into or damage the threads - good luck

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Datac
Well, On the really really tough ones, (seems most are) I take and cut a slot thru the whole section still left in the block with a modified hacksaw blade.Or you can even jump in there with a 1/8" carbide bit in a Dremel and take a whole slice out across (moving straight in and out) of whats left of the old pipe. It wont matter if you destroy a small line of threads in the block. Then I take a "Cape" chisel and get the old piece to Curl up on itself. Usually they pop right out once you get it started. It is best to make sure your exhaust valve stays shut during the process so chips and grit wont get into the cylinder. Chris L

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DRofHEAT
Having had this problem in the past in my field of work we use a sawzall with a fine blade and do the split and curl method works on any size from 3/4 inch and up just cut slow they make a short and fine sawzall blade more like a jigsaw blade i supose the dremel tool would work as well and any little thread damage in most cases can be cleaned up after with a bottom tap just to chase the threads in this case I would think about using neversieze just my thoughts which ever option u chose go slow and good luck Len

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Kent
I guess I didn't word it properly, what I have left in the exhaust port is very minimal pipe left from the muffler pipe. I have allready tried to chisel out what I could and whats left is on the inner threads closest in. I just ordered a large easy out type of tool and plan on trying to start the engine, warm up the block then try the new tool to hopefully unscrew whats left. I will keep you posted as to what happens. Thanks for all the input, it's always nice for free advice. Thanks, Al

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Guest
I couldn't resist chiming in on this. I've worked as a HVAC tech for the last 30 yrs and have dealt with more broken-off-too-short-to-grab hunks of pipe than you could imagine. In my recollection I've NEVER been able to remove a single really tight chunk of pipe with any internal gripping device. i.e. easy out or internal wrench. You are expanding an already rusted tight fairly thin tube in order to grip and turn it. No way Jose. The cut and peel method has never failed or resulted in after therapy leakage. Two parallel cuts far enough apart to accomodate your narrowest chisel. Using a fine toothed,modified hacksaw blade. Cut down 'till you begin to take the top off the internal threads and begin peeling the strip up. Do NOT use a very sharp chisel to roll up the cut slice 'cause you don't wanna break it off before it's clear of the to be collapsed pipe. Collapse [ the pipe] and remove

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